Permanent

AACA Museum Collection

What was your first car? Do you have a dream car?

You may find them at the AACA Museum. The Museum collection currently numbers over 150 vehicles, all of which have been donated. Exhibited vehicles are rotated regularly.

At any given time, you can see 85-100 of these classic cars and trucks on display.

Collection vehicles span almost a century of American motoring from the 1895 Chicago Motor Benton Harbor to a 1977 Chrysler Cordoba with “fine Corinthian leather” seats. You’ll also see trucks and special vehicles like a 1924 REO Funeral Hearse and a 1935 Autocar Atlantic Tank Truck, as well as rare vehicles like our four magnificent Stearns-Knights and a pair of 1917 Pierce Arrows that were “retired” to the museum after decades of use.

Pre-1900

1895 Chicago Benton Harbor1895 Chicago Benton Harbor
Manufacturer: Chicago Motor Company Chicago, Illinois
Model: Benton Harbor Motorcycle
Engine: Unidentified 7.5 hp

This Benton Harbor is a rare survivor from the pioneer period of American automobile development. It was designed and built to compete in the 1895 Chicago Times-Herald Race. With a top speed of 23 miles per hour, the Benton Harbor may have been a viable competitor but production delays kept it out of the race.Restoration research revealed that this may be the first vehicle in America built from scratch as an automobile as opposed to construction on a modified horse-drawn carriage.

Museum Collection: Gift of David & Janet Kolzow – Morrison, IL

This Vehicle Adopted By: Richmond Region AACA

www.richmondaaca.org


1896 Ford Quadricycle1896 Ford Quadricycle

Manufacturer: Burnard Jarstfer, based on the Ford original
Model: Quadricycle
Base Price: Not applicable
Engine: Two-cylinder, 4 hp

Henry Ford’s 1896 Quadricycle was his first self-propelled vehicle. The 500-pound “car” received its name from its use of four standard bicycle wheels. After completion in his home shop, Ford had to remove door frame and some of the surrounding bricks to allow the vehicle to exit. While built as a prototype, Ford eventually sold the cycle car to a friend for $200.00.

Burnard Jarstfer built this replica literally “by eye,” basing his design on what he could see by viewing the original through its glass display case at Henry Ford’s Greenfield Village.

Long-Term Museum Loan: Courtesy of Charlotte Jarstfer

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!

Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


Aldrich_IMG_20130109_142613_1421897 Aldrich Autobuggy
Manufacturer: Richard Aldrich Millville, MA
Model: Autobuggy
Base Price: Not applicable
Engine: One-cylinder

Richard Aldrich was an engineer living in Millville, Massachusetts and was employed by the American Steel and Wire Co in nearby Worchester. He built this small 575 pound buggy that he drove on the streets. It is powered by horizontal single-cylinder engine with a unique chain drive arrangement to the rear wheels. An interesting feature of this car is the handle throttle that is incorporated within the tiller steering handle.This great example of early American engineering features a fresh 2012 restoration, and was awarded an AACA National First Prize in June 2012.

Museum Collection: Gift of David Kolzow, Mendota, Illinois

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!

Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.

1901-1909

1903 Ford Model A Two1903 Ford Model A Two

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company – Detroit and Lansing, MI
Model: Model A Two
Base Price: $850
Engine: Two-cylinder, 8 hp

On June 16, 1903, the Ford Motor Company was incorporated and started building automobiles that the average worker could afford in the Mack Avenue factory in Detroit, MI. Similar to the horse-drawn buggies of the day, the “A” was built on a rectangular, box-like chassis and looked similar to the Cadillac motor car built in the same era because Henry Ford had a hand in designing both vehicles. The two-cylinder engine was supplied by the Dodge Brothers and was coupled to a two-speed transmission, with foot operated controls. The car weighed 1,250 pounds and could reach a top speed of 30 miles per hour. Headlamps and a horn were accessories. Production figures are unclear but 607 units is the total number accepted by historians.

Museum Collection: Larry Porter Trust – “Alphabet Ford Collection”

This Vehicle Adopted by Phyllis & Ted Buff


1904 Ford Model B1904 Ford Model B Four

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company – Detroit, Michigan
Model: Model B Four
Base Price: $2,000
Engine: Four-cylinder, 24 hp

In 1904, Henry Ford set the path for his company to follow by breaking the land speed record in the famous “999” race car and opening a company branch in neighboring Canada. In Detroit, Ford Motor Company financier’s wanted more profits and he was forced to build the company’s first luxury car. The Model B Four represented a dramatic shift in direction for Ford, a direction that the company’s founder was opposed too. With a four-passenger body, the Model B was accented by polished wood and brass trim but all this luxury came at a price, $2,000. Mechanically, a shaft-drive and rear hub brakes set the Model B apart from other Ford’s. With the earlier Model A still selling well, unofficial production figures show only 150 Model B’s were produced, making it one of the rarest of the alphabet Ford cars.

Museum Collection: Larry Porter Trust – “Alphabet Ford Collection”

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1905-Ford-Model-C

1905 Ford Model C

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model C
Base Price: $950
Engine: Two-cylinder, 10 hp

For 1905, Ford offered three vehicles, the B, C and F. With the new offerings and a production increase, came the move to a new plant on Piquette Avenue in Detroit. For the first time, Ford began production of their own engines and planetary running gears. Most historians recognize the 1905 model as a carry-over from 1904 as the move to the new plant brought increased production problems and dramatically increased new-model production time. The C version was available in two models – an open-air runabout and a runabout with a tonneau style covering. An optional windshield was available from the factory. The Canadian built cars included a side-entry door on the tonneau model. This vehicle’s body was painted by Barry and Lindie Eash of B & I Enterprises, Windber, Pennsylvania, as a gift to the AACA Museum.

Museum Collection: Larry Porter Trust – “Alphabet Ford Collection”

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1902 Paragon1905 Paragon Roadster

Manufacturer: Detroit Automobile Mfg. Co—Detroit, Michigan
Model: Paragon Runabout
Base Price: $357
Engine: Two-cylinder, 5 hp

Automotive historians are unsure of the exact number of American automobile manufacturers. Estimates range from about 1,500 to over 2,700. Many companies incorporated, sold stock and produced literature but no actual cars.

The Detroit Automobile Manufacturing Company built an unknown number of Paragons before receding into history. This two-seat runabout weighs 650 pounds. It is powered by a two-cylinder, two-stroke, air-cooled engine. Advertisements claimed a maximum speed of 22 miles per hour.

Museum Collection: Gift of E. E. “Chip” Rohr – Manassas, VA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1905-Cadillac1905 Cadillac Model E Runabout

Manufacturer: Cadillac Motor Company – Detroit, Michigan
Model: Model E Runabout
Base Price: $750
Engine: One-cylinder, 9 hp

Cadillac founder, Henry Leland, developed his skills as a fine machinist under firearm manufacturer, Samuel Colt. He moved to Detroit in 1890 to produce precision gears and was soon making steam engines for street cars.

After developing the gas engine for the 1901 Curved Dash Olds, he attracted a group of financial backers who partnered with him to form the Cadillac Motor Company, named for the French explorer who had discovered Detroit in the early 18th Century. Cadillac pioneered the interchangeability of parts prior to Ford’s assembly line. Its cars won many awards, leading to the advertising slogan, “Standard of the World.”

Museum Collection: Gift of Jarvis S. Barton – Portland, CT

This Vehicle Adopted By Carolina Region, Cadillac & LaSalle Club
www.crclc.org


1905 (circa) International Harvester

Manufacturer: International Harvester Co. Chicago, Illinois
Model: Columbus Wagon
Base Price: Unknown
Engine: None (Actual Horse Power)

The International Harvester Company was formed in 1902 as a result of the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company’s merger with four other farm equipment machine firms. Stiff competition among approximately 2,000 different farming manufacturers and a general lack of capital for development had paved the way for this historic merger. The Columbus was an intermediate model wagon with ornate striping. Horse-drawn wagons were the backbone of American agriculture through the first half of the 20th century. In 1907, International began producing the Autobuggy, a gasoline powered truck. A 1907 model is in the Museum’s collection.

Museum Collection: Gift of Rodney Fye – Sidman, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1906_waltham_orient1906 Waltham Orient

Manufacturer: Waltham Waltham, Massachusetts
Model: Orient
Base Price: $400
Engine: One-cylinder, 4 hp

The Waltham Manufacturing Company was organized in 1893 for the production of Orient bicycles. The Orient name was given to the first automobiles. They built cars from 1905 to 1908 and again in 1921 (the company was called “Metz” in between).

This buckboard was owned by Frank Abramson, one of the founders of the Antique Automobile Club of America. Originally refurbished in the 1930s, he used the car as a rolling billboard to promote businesses in downtown Philadelphia. The sight of 25 year old car in operation was uncommon at that time. Frank attracted others with a like interest, which eventually lead to the founding of the Antique Automobile Club of America.

Museum Loan: Courtesy of the Abramson Family

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1906-Ford-Model-F1906 Ford Model F

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn – Michigan
Model: Model F
Base Price: $1,100
Engine: Two-cylinder, 10 hp

In 1906, Henry Ford became president of the Ford Motor Company and Ford’s market share had risen to over one-fourth of all the cars built to 26.3%. The Model F was built as a two-door, five passenger touring car. This would be the final year for the two-cylinder engine. A strong demand for the F, an overabundance of cars, and an old design, kept it as the only holdover from 1905. The engine was mounted under the seat and the gas tank was under the hood. Several types of tops were offered. First time standard equipment included cowl-mounted oil lamps and a horn on the steering post.

Museum Collection: Larry Porter Trust – “Alphabet Ford Collection”

This Vehicle Adopted by the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant


1906-Ford-Model-N1906 Ford Model N

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn – Michigan
Model: Model N
Base Price: $500
Engine: Four-cylinder, 15 hp

The Model N was a positive step on Ford’s path toward the development of a reliable, mass-production car. The N featured a front-mounted engine that could propel the car to a top speed of 45 miles per hour. Styling was improved by the addition of nickel-plated front lamps and a boat-tail rear deck.

Museum Collection: Larry Porter Trust – “Alphabet Ford Collection”

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1907-Ford-Model-R1907 Ford Model R

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model R
Base Price: $750
Engine: Four-cylinder, 15 hp

A Ford ad slogan, “Watch the Ford’s Go By” had an effect on car buyers and Ford’s market share climbed to 35% in 1907. The Model R was introduced in 1907 as a refined version of the Model N. With full front fenders and attaching running boards, it was available in two colors, Brewster Green and Carmine Red. This year also featured the first use of a “spare wheel” under the rear cover for on-the-road tire changes. Sales on the Model R far outpaced sales forecasts and Ford parts suppliers were hard pressed to keep up with production demands. The side lever controls the two-speed planetary transmission.

Museum Collection: Larry Porter Trust – “Alphabet Ford Collection”

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1907 International1907 International Harvester

Manufacturer: International Harvester Co. Chicago, Illinois
Model: Model B Farmer’s Auto
Base Price: $600
Engine: Two-cylinder, 16 hp

The International Harvester Company is best known for manufacturing farm equipment. This model is also known as a “Highwheeler” or “Autobuggy.”

Using the philosophy that the buggy had served town, country and rural people for years, the company replaced the horse with a two-cylinder engine. The result was a solid, popular vehicle that sold 4,500 units between 1907 and 1911 when IHC ended automobile production to concentrate on trucks.

This example was restored in 1970. It has won numerous AACA awards, including a Grand National in 1986.

Museum Collection: Gift of Hollis Henderson – Lincolnton, NC

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1908-Ford-Model-K1908 Ford Model K

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model K
Base Price: $2,800
Engine: Six-cylinder, 40 hp

In it’s final year of production, the Model K was offered as a large touring car and a runabout replacement for the Model B. Ford produced the K, N, R and S models in 1908 with the K offered as a 3-4 passenger roadster and a touring car. With the promise of new Model T just months away, the 1908 models were contended to be 1907 and some, 1906 models. Dealers were reluctant to take the low-profit cars with the competition from Packard and Cadillac taking up a large part of their market share. This particular model is classified as a Mother-In-Law Seat Roadster. Today, only 10 examples of the model K are known to exist. The rare car was refurbished by members of AACA’s Susquehannock Region in 2010 and shown at several major venues, which earned it a 2011 invitation to the prestigious Amelia Island Concour d’ Elegance.

Museum Collection: Larry Porter Trust – “Alphabet Ford Collection”

This Vehicle Adopted by the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant


1908-Ford-Model-S1908 Ford Model S

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model S
Base Price: $700
Engine: Four-cylinder, 15 hp

The 1908 Model S Runabout was one of seven different body styles offered by Ford over their K, N, R and S model lines. The Model S shared the same body as the Model N and was unique because of the cowl lamps. Because of the customer demand for the Model N, Ford positioned the Model S between the Model N and Model R to continue production. The Model S weighed 1400 pounds and achieved 45 miles-per-hour.

Museum Collection: Larry Porter Trust – “Alphabet Ford Collection”

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1908 Ford Model S Roadster

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, MI
Model: Model S
Base Price: $700
Engine: Four-cylinder, 15 hp

This “Mother-in-Law Seat Roadster” is in unrestored condition. The S model of 1908 also came in a runabout body style, which is also shown in our collection.

Being paired together in 1908, the Model S and Model N sold a total of 6,398 units that year. However, Ford knew that his customers wanted a lightweight, simple, and inexpensive car, and that was his mission. Not relying on his previous successes Henry put his most trusted employees to work, and so Walter Flanders, Joseph Galamb, Charles Sorensen, and Harold Wills began working on Ford’s idea. This idea and project quickly became top secret, and soon the Model S was laid to rest only after a year of production, and the Model T was born.

Museum Collection: Larry Porter Trust – “Alphabet Ford Collection”

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1909-Ford-Model-T1909 Ford Model T

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model T
Base Price: $850
Engine: Four-cylinder, 22 hp

The Model T was Ford’s only offering in 1909. The Model T was introduced in October of 1908 and was a totally new car in comparison to Ford’s previous models. It was available in five body styles-touring, runabout (roadster), coupe, town car and landaulet. The first 2,500 Model Ts had minor variations and are considered unique by automotive historians and collectors. Nearly 14,000 were produced in 1909 and were second in sales only to Buick. The Model T brought many changes to Ford manufacturing. The engines had removable cylinder heads and three main-bearing crankshafts. The many body parts contained wood, metal and aluminum and made the Model T a well suited mode of transportation for the badly rutted early roads and in some cases, fields. After production started, a variety of tops were offered along with windshield’s and carbide lights.

Museum Collection: Larry Porter Trust – “Alphabet Ford Collection”

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.

1910-1919

1910 Schacht Touring Roadster


1910-Brush-11910 Brush D Runabout

Manufacturer:
Model: D, 3-Passenger Runabout
Base Price: $505
Engine: One-cylinder, 10 hp

During the first decade of the 20th Century, hundreds of American manufacturers introduced a wide variety of automobiles. The Brush Runabout Company (1907-1911) focused on building small, well crafted machines that consistently proved themselves in events like the Glidden Tour and the Pike’s Peak climb. Coil springs at all four corners and wooden axles (and frame) combine to give the car excellent balance.

This roadster was rescued from a barn by its last private owner. After restoration it received numerous AACA awards, including a Grand National in 1980.

Museum Collection: Gift of Donald Brush – Webster, NY

This Vehicle Available for AdoptionYOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1910 Buick Model 10 Surrey

Manufacturer:
Model: Model 10 Surrey
Base Price: $1,050
Engine: Four-cylinder, 22 hp

Buick was one of the early leaders in automobile production, consistently ranking in the top five during much of the first quarter of the 20th century. Its Model 10 was marketed as a competitor to Ford’s industry-leading T.

This Buick is noted for it inclusion of oil lamps, taillights, headlights, gas generator and a horn as standard equipment. William Durant, founder of General Motors, used Buick as the base for building his multi-faceted corporation.

This is one of two vehicles donated by Jarvis Barton. This one was given in memory of Edwin A. and James C. Barton, Jr.

Museum Collection: Gift of Jarvis S. Barton – Portland, CT

This Vehicle Adopted By Mason Dixon Chapter of Buick Club
Contact Information: dbeckley@epix.net | (717)395-7128


1910 Maxwell Model 101910 Maxwell Model 10 Surrey

Manufacturer: Company – Tarrytown, NY
Model: Model 10 Surrey
Base Price: $1,000
Engine: Four-cylinder, 22 hp

Although the company’s cars are seldom seen today, Maxwell was a significant manufacturer of the early 20th century. The car earned its solid reputation through solid performances in many early reliability tours; in fact a Maxwell was driven from New York City to San Francisco by four women in 1909 (an almost unheard of event prior to that time). In 1910 Maxwell ranked third in U.S. sales behind Ford and Buick.

The company survived until 1924 when Walter P. Chrysler merged it with his new Chrysler Corporation. This vehicle was donated by Sue Johnson in memory of Doug Johnson.

Museum Collection: Gift of Sue Johnson – Rockaway, NJ

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


Don-Weir's-1910-Otto1910 Otto Roadster

Manufacturer: Philadelphia, PA
Model: Roadster – 3 passenger
Base Price: $1,950
Engine: Four-cylinder, 30 hp

Otto Gas Engine Works was a leading engine manufacturer when it turned to building automobiles in 1910. The experiment lasted for 3 years with the company building a limited number of automobiles in a variety of body styles. The Otto was purchased new by members of the donor’s family in Philadelphia. It remained in the family for a century until its 2010 donation to the Museum. The Otto Roadster is often referred to as the “poor man’s Mercer,” in reference to the sporty looks and spirited performance it shared with the more expensive, much-desired gentleman’s roadster. This vehicle was returned to running condition by Donald Weir, a Museum volunteer and friend of the donor, who was instrumental in securing the car for the Museum’s collection.

Museum Collection: Gift of Joseph Penrose, Jr. – Norwalk, CT

This Vehicle Adopted By Hank Hallowell of Hershey, Pennsylvania


1910 Schmidt Truck


1912 Cadillac Touring1912 Cadillac Touring

Manufacturer:
Model: Five Passenger Touring
Base Price: $1,800
Engine: Four-cylinder, 40 hp

The powerful role of the automobile in the development of America is undisputable. Cars opened numerous doors and expanded social and economic boundaries across our nation and the world.

Ford’s Model T made cars affordable, but they were still hard to crank start. This changed in 1912 when Cadillac introduced the first production car with an electric self-starter. Invented by engineer Charles Kettering, the starter served as the basis for the new Dayton Engineering Laboratories (Delco Electronics) which was later absorbed by General Motors. This Cadillac had only two owners prior to its donation. It is mostly original with less than 3,000 miles.

Museum Gift: From Thomas and Bonnie Macaluso, Salt Lake City, UT

This Vehicle Adopted By Richard P. Sills, AACA Board of Directors


1912 Ford Model T “C” Cab Truck


1912-Stearns-Knight1912 Sterns-Knight Toy Tonneau Runabout

Manufacturer: Cleveland, Ohio
Model: Toy Tonneau Runabout
Base Price: $3,590
Engine: Four-cylinder, 28 hp

Frank B. Stearns built his first car in 1896 at age seventeen. The son of a wealthy Cleveland industrialist, Stearns began his automotive career his own machine shop in the basement of his family’s Euclid Avenue home in Cleveland, Ohio. A man of wealth and refined tastes, his cars were known for their quality and style.

The Stearns is widely regarded as among the best cars of the early 20th century. Its reputation was built, in part, by victories in hill climbs and endurance runs.

Museum Collection: Gift of The F. B. Stearns Supporting Organization

This Vehicle Adopted By F. B. Stearns Supporting Org. Willoughby, Ohio


1913-Model-T-Photo21913 Ford Model T

Manufacturer:
Model: Model T Touring
Base Price: $600
Engine: Four-cylinder, 20 hp

Ford’s Model T radically altered American society by putting affordable transportation within reach of the majority of the population. The car sold millions of units; it remained virtually unchanged for two decades. The 1913 model is the last T available in a choice of paint colors. Given the fact that the black paint of the era dried much faster than other colors, Ford sacrificed variety for production speed. This practice continued into the mid-1920s, giving rise to the observation that you could buy a Model T in “any color so long as it’s black.”

Museum Collection: Gift of Jonathan & Nancy Griggs – Hershey, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1913 Ford Model T “C” Cab Truck


1913-Overland1913 Overland 4DR Touring

Manufacturer: Terre Haute, Indiana
Model: Four-Passenger Touring
Base Price: $1,475
Engine: Four-cylinder, 30.6 hp

The story of Overland is a rollercoaster ride typical of many of our nation’s early automobile manufacturers. The Overland was advanced for its time. Early models featured a removable ignition plug that prevented auto theft when left unattended. Overland was in danger of collapsing in 1907. John Willys a New York dealer with a $10,000 deposit on an order of 500 cars stepped in and assumed company management. The newly reorganized Willys-Overland Company oscillated between the verge of bankruptcy and years of multi-million dollar profit. Production continued through the 1930s.

Museum Collection: Gift of Sue Rash – Berwick, Pennsylvania

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1914-Packard-3-481914 Packard 3-48 Limousine

Manufacturer: Detroit, MI
Model: 3-48, 7-Passenger Limo
Base Price: $5,900
Engine: Six-cylinder, 82 hp

In April 1913 Packard released a one year production vehicle, the stunning 1914 Model 3-48. Only 1,499 Model 3-48s were made in the fiscal year of 1914, and even less were Type 1 Limousines. This model differed from the ordinary Packard in several ways. The 3-48 had a larger wheel base of 139 inches, was offered in 42 different exterior color combinations. It was equipped with the 525 cubic inch T-head engine, which produced an incredible 82 horsepower, making it one of the most powerful production engines at that time. There were many options available for the Model 3-48. This 7 passenger limousine came with a Klaxton Model L horn, a Warner Model M Auto Meter, a gentlemen’s smoking set for $2.90, and rear tire carrier which cost $20.00.

Museum Collection: Gift from the Estate of Ed Marion – Palm Beach, FL

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1914-Garford-Truck1914 Garford Stake Bed

Manufacturer:
Model: Stake Bed Truck
Base Price: $1,300
Engine: 4-cylinder, HP Unknown

The earliest commercially-manufactured trucks, such as this Garford, were purpose-built as motorized freight-wagons, designed to move heavy loads. Buyers generally received an engine and chassis; they would build a body and cab to meet their individual needs. This truck was built for slow and steady hauling. Its four-cylinder engine produced more than enough torque to power its chain-driven dual rear solid rubber wheels. Garford produced trucks from 1909 to 1933. This example was restored by Penske Truck Leasing for company promotions.

Museum Collection: Gift of Gift of Penske Truck Leasing – Reading, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Bill & Janet Bird of Elyria, Ohio


1914-Stearns-Knight1914 Sterns-Knight 7 Passenger Touring

Manufacturer: Cleveland, Ohio
Model: Seven Passenger Touring
Base Price: $5,000
Engine: Six-cylinder, 43 hp

Stearns-Knight was one of the premier automakers of the early 20th century.
This seven-passenger touring car is the largest Stearns in the AACA Museum’s collection. It was available in three colors – blue, maroon and green. Standard features included a 30 gallon gas tank and two extra rims. This model also features jump seats and detachable side curtains for inclement weather conditions.

Stearns, and later, Stearns-Knight, produced cars from 1901 to 1929. The company’s last profitable year was 1925 and they ended production after the stock market crash that preceded the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Museum Collection: Gift of the F. B. Stearns Supporting Organization

This Vehicle Adopted By Bill Rothermel, AACA Board of Directors


1914_Hupmobile1914 Hupmobile Model 32 Touring

Manufacturer: Detroit, MI
Model: Model 32 Touring
Base Price: $1,200
Engine: Four-cylinder, 32 hp

Robert Craig Hupp debuted the first Hupmobile in 1909. Despite being produced for the lower-price class, the Hupmobile featured a two-speed sliding gear transmission and high tension magneto. Following Hupp’s departure from the company in 1911, Hupmobile underwent a transformation and became a fairly successful car company. The Model 32, a larger and more powerful vehicle than its predecessor, debuted in 1912 and sold well over the next few years. This Model 32 Hupmobile is fully functional and has been completely restored using original or period parts.

Museum Collection: Gift of James & Elizabeth Homan – Cutchogue, NY

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1916_Chevrolet_Baby_Grand1914 Chevrolet H-4 Baby Grand Touring

Manufacturer: Detroit, Michigan
Model: H-4 Baby Grand Touring
Base Price: $850
Engine: Four-cylinder, 24 hp

Chevrolet offered five models for 1914. The H-4, also known as a “Baby Grand,” was a four-door, five-passenger roadster. Other models in the lineup included the H-2 “Royal Mail” Turtledeck Roadster and the lower-priced 490 series, which was designed to compete with the Model T Ford. The “H” series boasted demountable rims and an optional $125.00 Auto-Lite starting, generating and lighting system with battery.

This car was given in memory of Otto Frey and his wife, Lillian Frey.

Museum Collection: Gift of Shirl Stevens – Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.

1916_Woods_Mobilette1916 Woods Mobilette No. 5 Staggered Roadster

Manufacturer: Harvey, Illinois
Model: No. 5 Staggered Roadster
Base Price: $380
Engine: Four-cylinder, 4 hp

The Woods Mobilette was billed as America’s first cyclecar. Produced from 1913 to 1916, the car’s price remained fixed at $380.00.
Records indicate the company made 1,000 vehicles per month during peak production in 1914. The No. 5 features staggered seating as seen in this roadster. Company advertisements touted the car’s gas efficiency and traveling distance. Miles per gallon and miles per hour were both noted to be in the 35 to 40 range.

Museum Collection: Gift of William R. Kahl – Reistertown, MD

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1917-Pierce-Arrow-Touring-Car1917 Pierce-Arrow Model 66 Touring

Manufacturer: Buffalo, New York
Model: Model 66
Base Price: $6,500
Engine: Six-Cylinder, 60 HP

Along with Packard and Peerless, Pierce-Arrow was one of the fabled “three Ps” of United States automotive royalty. The firm started in 1901 as an outgrowth of the George N. Pierce Company, a bicycle manufacturer and earlier a bird cage maker. Pierce made its reputation with high quality cars, often custom built for its clients. This car was owned by the same family for 80 years. It was purchased as a “used car” in 1923 for $800 by the last owner’s father. It has a rich history of being driven to Pierce-Arrow meets for over half a century, accumulating over 300,000 miles in the process.

Museum Collection: Gift of Gene & Pauline Becker – Sarasota, FL

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1917-Pierce-Arrow-Roadster1917 Pierce-Arrow Model 38 Runabout

Manufacturer: Buffalo, New York
Model: Model 38, Runabout
Base Price: $4,800
Engine: Six-cylinder, 38 hp

Pierce-Arrow really hits its stride during the second decade of the 20th century. Pierce was an innovative manufacturer, offering features such as aluminum bodies, dual valve engines and power brakes. This roadster sports the fender headlamp, a trademark design feature that began in 1913.

Pierce-Arrow ended production in 1938, a victim of the depression and changing tastes. The company manufactured approximately 85,000 cars; there are less than 2,000 documented survivors.

Museum Collection: Gift of Gene & Pauline Becker – Sarasota, FL

This Vehicle Adopted By AACA Shenandoah Region


1919-Ivory-Flyer1919 Briggs & Stratton Ivory Flyer

Manufacturer: Milwaukee, WI
Model: Model J “Flyer”
Base Price: $175
Engine: One-cylinder, 2 hp

Briggs and Stratton corporation is probably best known as a manufacturer of quality engines for lawn mowers and min-bikes. However, in the early 20th Century, they were a manufacturer of automotive accessories that invested half a million dollars in a new building and equipment to diversify into the production of actual vehicles.

The company purchased the rights to a buckboard type vehicle called the Smith Motor Wheel. They renamed it the Briggs and Stratton Flyer and increased its engine output from 1 to 2 horsepower. The Flyer was made from 1919 to 1923. This is a special restoration done by the company.

Museum Collection: Gift of Briggs & Stratton Corporation Foundation

This Vehicle Adopted By BRIGGS & STRATTON CORPORATION FOUNDATION, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

1920-1929

1920-Ford-Model-T-Truck1920 Ford Model T Truck

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Engine: 2.9-liter, 4-cylinder, side- valve unit
Transmission: Planetary type with a multiple disc clutch.

The Ford Model TT truck was based on the Ford Model T , but with a heavier frame and rear axle giving it a rating of 1 short ton (0.91 t). The wheelbase of the Model TT was 125 inches compared to 100 inches for the Model T.

The Model TT was often sold as a chassis with the buyer supplying the truck body and the cab. Mass production with Ford produced bodies ran from 1925 to 1927, but production of the Model TT had started with the first chassis being released in 1917. In 1923, it cost $380. In 1925, a hand operated windshield wiper was added.

The TT Truck was very durable for the time, but slow when compared to other trucks. With standard gearing, a speed of not more than 15 mph (was recommended, and with special gearing, a speed of not more than 22 mph (35 km/h) was recommended, according to Ford Dealers Data Book 1923.

The vehicle displayed here is in original condition and shown as if just pulled from a barn following many years of well deserved rest.

Museum Loan: Courtesy of the Dave Cammack Collection

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1921 Evans Power Cycle

Manufacturer: Cyclemotor Corporation Rochester, NY
Model: Power-Cycle
Base Price: $135
Engine: 1.5 hp Motor

Evans began making the Power-Cycle in 1917, after their motors to propel bicycles became a huge success. By 1922, majority of the Power-Cycles were exported because Americans never took an interest into this lightweight motor cycle. Production ended in 1926. This particular Evans became a member of the Evans Automotive Collection of Holden, Massachusetts, in September 1988.

The 1921 Power-Cycle weights a grand total of 70 pounds. The entire lubrication system is auto-matic and positive. On 1 gallon of gas this Cycle can go 80-100 miles. This Cycle has various speeds from a slow walk, to high speeds, and everything in between.

Museum Collection: Donated by Robert E. Evans

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1921 Hanover Cycle Car w/Trailer

Manufacturer: Hanover Car Company Hanover, PA
Model: Two-Seater Roadster
Base Price: $345
Engine: Two-cylinder, 12 hp

During the first quarter of the 20th century, thousands of individuals tried their hand at manufacturing automobiles. Almost every major town and city across the nation had an automaker. Pennsylvania had over 200, including Hanover, which made roughly 150 cars between 1921 and 1927. The Hanover was essentially a lightweight, miniature version of a full-size car. It featured a pressed steel frame and two-seater racing type body. The company guaranteed 50 miles per gallon and 20,000 miles per set of tires, strong claims for an early car. There are less than a half dozen documented Hanover’s in existence. This example, with its matching trailer, was restored in the early 1960s and was once part of the famous Harrah Collection in Reno, Nevada.

Museum Collection: Promised Gift of Mark Hyman – St. Louis, MO

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1922 Auto Standard Red Bug


1923_Ford_ModelT_3D_Touring1923 Ford Model T Touring

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model T Touring
Base Price: $298
Engine: Four-cylinder, 22.5 hp

Ford’s Model T radically altered American society by putting affordable transportation within reach of the majority of the population. The car sold millions of units; it remained virtually unchanged for two decades. The 1913 model is the last T available in a choice of paint colors. Given the fact that the black paint of the era dried much faster than other colors, Ford sacrificed variety for production speed. This practice continued into the mid-1920s, giving rise to the observation that you could buy a Model T in “any color so long as it’s black.” This vehicle was painstakingly restored by its last private owner using numerous new old stock Ford parts, along with the finest reproduction pieces.

Museum Collection: Gift of William Linkenhoker – Savannah, Georgia

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1923 Moon Touring 6-50


1923_Nash_Touring_Car1923 Nash Model 48 Touring

Manufacturer: Nash Motors Kenosha, WI
Model: 48, 5-Passenger Touring
Base Price: $1,195
Engine: Four-cylinder, 37

Nash Motors Company began in 1916 when Charlie Nash bought the Thomas B. Jeffery Company. In the early years, Nash Motors specialized in commercial vehicles. However, by the 1920’s, the company had begun phasing out their commercial truck production in order to focus on car production. This sport-touring car features its original colors. In 1954, Nash Motors Company acquired Hudson Motor Car Company and became known as the American Motors Corporation (AMC). AMC was bought in 1987 by the Chrysler Corporation.

This vehicle was donated in loving memory of our parents, Edgar and Sarah Smith of Amesville, Ohio, by Dixie, Louie, Allen, Sally and Sheila.

Museum Collection: Gift of the Smith Family of Ohio

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1923 O’Connell Model 735D 3.5 T Truck

Manufacturer: O’Connell Motor Truck Co.
Waukegan, IL
Model: Model 70 (D), 3 1/2 ton
Base Price: $4,100
Engine: Four-cylinder, 28.9 hp

O’Connell Motor Truck Company was created in 1917, and was teamed up with Manly Motor Company. The name was later changed to just O’Connell Motor Truck Company. This “Super Truck” is a Model 70 (D), and is a 3 1/2 ton truck. The “D” suffix indicates the truck has a dump bed. The equipment on the bed is not standard, but complements the truck nicely. One of the most unusual features of this truck is that it was engineered to be driven “forward” in two different directions. This made possible by the turning wheels being located behind the driver like modern day forklifts, and that the drivers seat pivoted around the steering column. A patent was applied for this feature. The term “2-Way Drive” was soon coined.

Museum Collection: Gift of Judith Stager –Ridgeway, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1924_Graham_Brothers_Dodge_Truck1924 Graham/Dodge Truck

Manufacturer: Graham Brothers Company Evansville, IN
Model: 1/2 Ton Truck
Base Price: $1,570
Engine: Four-cylinder, 24 hp

Ray, Joseph and Robert Graham were born into an Indiana farm family. They got their start in the auto industry by converting Ford cars into one-ton express or stake trucks. Soon they were making truck bodies for passenger car chassis and had their own line of trucks by 1920. Their success attracted the Dodge Brothers who were looking to enter the truck market. Through a deal signed in 1921, the Grahams built trucks solely with Dodge engines and drive trains, for sale exclusively through the Dodge dealer network. This truck was restored by Ferd Page, proprietor of Page Restorations in Montoursville, PA, and a life-long member of AACA’s Susquehannock Region.

Museum Collection: Gift Ted Maurer – Pottstown, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Treasure Coast Vintage Car Club Treasure Coast Region, AACA – Stuart, FL
www.tcvcc.com


1924-Moon_Touring_Car1924 Moon 6-50 Touring

Manufacturer: Moon Motor Car Company St. Louis, MO
Model: 6-50 Touring
Base Price: $1,495
Engine: Six-cylinder, 50 hp

Joseph Moon was an Ohio farmer who started a buggy business in St. Louis in the late 19th century. His first automobile, built in 1905, was a five-passenger touring car. Unlike most of his contemporaries, Moon began with a new design, rather than motorizing an existing horse-drawn buggy platform. Never an industry giant, Moon offered an “assembled automobile” composed of major components manufactured by outside firms. The Moon was advertised as “The Ideal American Car,” a claim supported by refinements such as hydraulic brakes and demountable tires and rims.

This vehicle was donated by Antoinette LoCurcio in memory of her husband, Vincent.

Museum Collection: Gift of Antoinette LoCurcio – Nutley, NJ

This Vehicle Adopted By Richie Clyne, AACA Board of Directors


1924 Reo Funeral Hearse

Manufacturer: REO Motor Car Company Lansing, Michigan
Model: Funeral Hearse
Engine: Six-cylinder, 50 hp

Ransom E. Olds secured his spot in American history by creating two successful automobile manufacturing companies. Oldsmobile once held the distinction of being one of America’s oldest automotive manufacturers (1897-2004). Olds left his company in 1904 with a settlement that prohibited him from using his name in any new automotive venture. He still had his initials (REO), which he used for his second company in 1905.

This funeral hearse probably began life as a five passenger Model T-6 Sedan. The custom body features glass side panels trimmed with carved wood. It was cleverly used to clandestinely transport alcohol during Prohibition (1920-1933). This particular vehicle was used for filming in HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire”.

Museum Collection: Gift of James & Elizabeth Homan – Cutchogue, NY

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1925_Ford_ModelT_Coke_Truck1925 Ford Model T Depot Hack

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company – Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model T
Base Price: $375
Engine: Four-cylinder, 22 hp

In 1925 Ford gave the Model T its first major restyling since 1917 and offered a variety of different body styles from sedans to three-door trucks. In May of that year, Ford produced the Closed Cab Truck for the first time. Basic equipment on the 1925 Model included three oil lamps only, two on the sides and one on the tail. Available options included windshields, horns, headlamps, bumpers and speedometers.

This vehicle is a highly researched, authentic reproduction of a Coca-Cola delivery truck, built by the donor. Prior to its donation, it was used in numerous parades and special events.

Museum Collection: Gift of Frankie ∓ Peggy Easterday – Maryland

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1925-Stearns-Knight1925 Stearns-Knight 5 Pax Sports Sedan

Manufacturer: Stearns-Knight – Cleveland, Ohio
Model: Five Passenger Sport Sedan
Base Price: $2,475
Engine: Six-cylinder, 70 hp

Stearns-Knight was a leading producer of prestigious automobiles from 1912 to 1929. Early cars were built for the affluent motorist; nearly all models were priced over $3,000 about five times the cost of a Model T.
John North Willys bought Stearns in 1925. He kept Stearns an independent manufacturer rather than adding the company to his growing Willys-Overland empire.

Stearns-Knight ended production after the stock market crash put its exclusive cars both out of reach and out of fashion.

Museum Collection: Gift of the F. B. Stearns Supporting Organization

This Vehicle Adopted By F. B. Stearns Supporting Org. Willoughby, Ohio


1926_Ford_ModelT_Roadster_Green1925 Ford Model T Speedster

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company – Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model T Speedster
Base Price: $375
Engine: Four-cylinder, 22 hp

In 1908, Henry Ford debuted the famous Model T. Nicknamed the ‘Tin Lizzy’, it was available in numerous body styles until the end of production in 1927. These were hugely popular vehicles, selling more than 2.1 million units in 1925 alone! Because of their popularity, many were converted for sporty driving or racing with lightweight bodies. This example features a speedster body– essentially just two seats, a fuel tank and a monocle windshield– that emulates the famous Mercer and Stutz Bearcat racers of the day.

Museum Collection: Estate of Hollis & Marilyn Henderson– Mount Pleasant, NC

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1925 Ford Model TT Truck

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company – Detroit, Michigan
Model: TT Truck
Base Price: $370.00
Engine: 4 cylinder, 20 H.P

The Ford Model TT truck was based on the Ford Model T, but with a heavier frame and rear axle. Production began in 1917 with it initially being sold as a chassis only the buyer supplying the truck body and the cab. Mass production with Ford produced bodies started in 1925 and continued through 1927.

In the 1920s Gaspare Genuardi sold fresh produce door-to-door from a Model TT truck like the one displayed here painted in the “G. Genuardi & Sons” livery. He and his sons continued the home delivery business for 20 years in the Norristown (PA) area. The Genuardi family also operated a small store, which grew over the years into Genuardi’s Family Markets. This vehicle was used to promote the business.

In December of 2000, Genuardi Family Markets was acquired by Safeway, Inc. however many stores continued to operate under the Genuardi name—their number gradually declining over the past decade.

Museum Collection: Gift of Safeway, Inc.

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1926_Ford_ModelT_Roadster1926 Ford Model T Roadster

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company – Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model T
Base Price: $500
Engine: Four-cylinder, 20 hp

The 1926 Ford line offered 18 different body or chassis styles. Ford buyers could have their “T” in anything from a two-door roadster to a platform body truck.

In terms of styling and design, the 1926 model was basically a carry-over of the “Improved Ford” of the previous year. In 1925 Ford had given the T its first major restyling since 1917.

This roadster sports demountable wheels and a starter as standard equipment. Note the World War II rationing sticker in the front window, an historical testament to the vehicle’s usefulness and durability.

Museum Collection: Gift of Julian Bennett – Unionville, VA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1926-Packard-Dietrich-Body-Sdn1926 Packard Dietrich Bodied Sedan

Manufacturer: Packard Motor Company – Detroit, Michigan
Model: Five-Passenger Club Sedan
Price: $2,725
Engine: Six-cylinder, 60 hp

Packard was known for their power and performance. By the middle of the “roaring 20s” they were considered among the elite of the American automobile industry and a leader in terms of design and technological innovation. This 1926 model features a six cylinder engine and improved suspension and brake systems. An 80 hp, eight-cylinder engine was also available that would propel the car to over 80 miles per hour. Buyers could choose from more paint colors for their 1926 vehicles; the company had begun using a new lacquer formula. Also new for 1926 was the “Club Sedan” body style, which comfortably seated 5 people. This example was built by the Dietrich body works on a 133 inch wheelbase.

Our Packard has just recently returned from a film studio where it was being used as Al Capone’s car for HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire”. Look for it in the new 2014 season!

Museum Collection: Gift of Kenneth Hampton – Edgewater, MD

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1926_WillsStClaire1926 Wills St. Claire

Manufacturer: Wills Sainte Claire Mtr. Co. Marysville, MI
Model: W-6 Roadster
Base Price: $2700
Engine: Six-cylinder, 66 hp

C. Harold Wills began his automotive career with Henry Ford. Serving as the company’s chief designer and metallurgist, he pioneered the use of vanadium steel, a key element in the success of the Model T. Wills left Ford in 1919 with a 1.5 million severance package and set out to make his own car. He built his plant on the shores of the St. Clair River in the small town of Marysville. No expense was spared in the design of his new car. Production was slow and methodical as Wills would frequently stop the assembly line to implement improvements. Approximately 12,000 cars were built between 1921 & 1926; about 80 survive.

Museum Collection: Gift of William B. Hunsberger – Hagerstown, MD

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1927-Ford-Model-T-Pickup1927 Ford Roadster Pickup

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model T Runabout Pickup
Base Price: $366
Engine: Four-cylinder, 20 hp

Ford’s versatile Model T was available in many different configurations during its 19 years of production. Customers could choose from a variety of passenger cars and two different kinds of pickup trucks, including this two-passenger runabout. The original owner of this truck paid an extra $25.00 for the runabout or roadster styled convertible body. Production of the Model T automobile officially ended on May 26, 1927, however, Ford continued to manufacture trucks and replacement engines for some time.

Museum Collection: Gift of John Sullivan – Venice, Florida

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1927_Whippet1927 Whippet Model 96 4DR

Manufacturer: Willys-Overland Company Toldedo, Ohio
Model: 96 Five-Passenger Sedan
Base Price: $725
Engine: Four-cylinder, 30 hp

The Whippet was aptly named. When introduced in 1926, it was America’s smallest car. It was also swift. At Indianapolis Speedway a six-cylinder model established a new class stock car record, completing a 24-hour endurance run averaging 52.56 miles per hour. The car became a popular seller among vehicles priced under $1000. The Wall Street crash and depression ended Whippet production.

Museum Collection: Gift of Robert ∓ Margaret Bauman – St. Petersburg, FL

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1928 Ford Model A Racecar

Manufacturer: Essex/Ford
Model: Race Car
Engine: Ford Model A, 3/4 race configuration

This dirt track sprint car was built in the 1960s, and features a modified Essex chassis with a 3/4 Ford Model A race engine with dual carburetors. It has participated in Antique Auto Racing Association events.

Museum Collection: Estate of John G. Addams – Mayfield Village, OH

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer


1928-Oldsmobile-Sidea1928 Oldsmobile F-28 Roadster

Manufacturer: Oldsmobile, Detroit & Lansing, MI
Model: F-28 Roadster
Base Price: $995
Engine: Six-cylinder, 55 hp

For 1928 Oldsmobile introduced its “F” series of automobiles. A longer chassis and larger, more powerful six-cylinder engine set the line apart from its predecessors. The series featured twelve different body styles, ranging from the two passenger coupes and roadsters to five passenger, two door sedans.

This roadster was owned by Robert Zenter, a longtime member of AACA’s Oneida Lake Region in central New York State. Robert took equal pride in preserving and showing the Oldsmobile, frequently driving it to and from events. It was restored by Richard J. Berns of Rochester, NY, who rebuilt it in his backyard and garage from a pile of parts he purchased in the late 1960s.

The Museum’s Oldsmobile has been used numerous times in the making of HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire”.

Museum Collection: Gift of the estate of Robert L & Toni Zenter – Syracuse, NY

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1928_Pierce_Arrow1929 Pierce-Arrow Model 36 Sedan

Manufacturer: Pierce-Arrow Buffalo, NY
Model: Model 36, Seven-Passenger Sedan
Base Price: $7,000
Engine: Six-cylinder, 100 hp

Pierce-Arrow is widely regarded as one of America’s finest automobile manufacturers. The Series 33 debuted in 1919 and served as their entry level model for the 1920s, being renamed the Model 36 in 1928. Pierce pioneered the use of aluminum components and multi-valve engines, yet waited until 1920 to move the steering wheel to the left side. This example features Pierce trademark, fender-mounted headlights, flanking a grill trimmed in German silver. The body appears to be custom-built. Originally owned by Paramount Studios, it was used to carry film actress Marlene Dietrich to and from her home in the Hollywood Hills. Beautifully restored by Ron Bissett in honor of his father, a former Pierce dealer, the car received an award at the 1999 Concours d’Elegance in Pebble Beach, CA.

Museum Collection: Gift of Bank of America – Wilmington, DE

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1929-Ford-Model-A-Roadster1929 Ford Model A Roadster

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Two-Door Roadster
Base Price: $450
Engine: Four-cylinder, 40 hp

On May 16th, 1929, Frank Hartmaier took possession of a new Model A Roadster. He was 17 years old and gainfully employed. He chose only two options for the car – a spare tire and a rumble seat. He put down $305 and financed the remaining $255 through the Pottstown Finance Co. Frank kept and used this car his entire life. He restored it four times over the course of ownership, accumulating over 400,000 miles before its speedometer stopped working. Frank and his car are well known in the Model A world as he personally drove this car to meets all over the country. This special car was left to the Museum in his will. The car’s first journey by trailer took place in the summer of 2008 when neighbor and friend, Fred Serfass brought it to the Museum to join the collection.

Museum Collection: Gift of Frank Hartmaier – Schwenksville, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By JC Taylor Insurance


1929 Harley-Davidson JDH

Manufacturer: Harley-Davidson Milwaukee, WI
Model: JDH
Base Price: $185
Engine: Twin-cam, hp unknown

This 1929 Harley-Davidson JDH was donated to the AACA Library & Research Center in 1987. A total of 10,000 JDH’s were produced in 1929 and could be purchased for $185. This motorcycle was equipped with a two-cam 74 cubic inch engine, which could propel the bike to speeds near 100 mph.

Your AACA Library & Research Center has more information on this motorcycle and thousands of other vehicles. Visit us in person at 501 W. Governor Rd, Hershey, Pa 17033 or on the internet at www.aacalibrary.org

AACA Library Collection: Gift of Betty Groftholdt – San Diego, CA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1929-Stearns-Knight1929 Stearns-Knight Model J8907

Manufacturer: Stearns-Knight – Cleveland, Ohio
Model: J-8-90 7-Passenger Sedan
Base Price: $5,600
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 120 hp

The Stearns-Knight was one of the highest priced cars of its era. At $5,600 it was nearly 10 times the cost of a typical Ford or Chevrolet. The Stearns, however, was far from a typical car.

Stearns-Knight was acquired by Willys-Overland in 1925; the new owners retained the Stearn’s hallmark of a white line on the inside of the front grill. They also maintained the Stearn’s identity rather than incorporating the marquee into the larger Willy’s-Overland Corporation.

Stearns-Knight maintained its reputation for quality

Museum Collection: Gift of the F. B. Stearns Supporting Organization

This Vehicle Adopted By F. B. Stearns Supporting Org. Willoughby, Ohio


1929_Packard_Jim1929 Packard Model 6-33 Touring

Manufacturer: Packard Motor Car Co. Detroit, Michigan
Model: 633 Five-Passenger Touring
Base Price: $6,500
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 90 hp

This long wheel-base 1929 Packard wears a coach built phaeton body. Wealthy customers often bought bare chassis from luxury car makers and had custom bodies installed by companies like Brunn and Dietrich. This vehicle features a separate cowl and windshield designed to protect rear seat passengers from wind and debris during spirited driving. The straight eight cylinder power plant replaced the V-12 in 1923 and would power Packard cars until the 1930s. The Packard family coat of arms appeared on the radiator emblem for the first time in 1929.

Museum Collection: Gift of Harry Eby Bellefonte, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1929_Plymouth_Coupe1929 Plymouth 2DR w/Rumble Seat

Manufacturer: Plymouth Detroit, Michigan
Model: Two-Door Deluxe Coupe
Base Price: $695
Engine: Four-cylinder, 45 hp

The Plymouth was Chrysler’s new car for 1928. It was built as an inexpensive family vehicle to compete with Ford and Chevy. The Plymouth offered four-wheel hydraulic brakes, full pressure engine lubrication, aluminum alloy pistons and an independent hand-brake, a combination of features that would not appear on Fords and Chevrolets for another ten years. This coupe features a rumble seat to accommodate additional passengers.

Museum Collection: Gift of David J. Bernstein – Salisbury, Maryland

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1930-1939

1930 Packard 7-34 Speedster/Runabout


1930_Cord_Roadster1930 Cord L-29 Convertible

Manufacturer: Cord Corporation Auburn, IN
Model: L-29 Convertible
Base Price: $3,295
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 125 hp

The L-29 Cord was a front-drive car introduced by Errett L. Cord to help bridge the gap existing between his line of Auburn and Duesenberg cars. It was heavily advertised before its introduction by ads frankly targeted to “those who can afford it.” Its design was hailed by critics on both sides of the Atlantic, but its chances for commercial success ended with the stock market crash and subsequent depression. Many connoisseurs today consider the L-29 the best-looking American car of the period.

Museum Collection: Gift of MBNA Corporation – Wilmington, DE

This Vehicle Adopted By Paul Merluzzi West Chester, Pennsylvania


1930-Dupont1930 DuPont Model G

Manufacturer: DuPont Wilmington, DE
Model: Model G Convertible
Base Price: $4,360
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 130 hp

E. Paul duPont was a wealthy industrialist who formed his company to build quality cars in limited numbers. duPont hired the best stylists in the business. From the start duPont’s cars earned a reputation for elegant and graceful coachwork. The Model G series, produced from 1929 to the company’s demise in 1932, was offered in 12 different body styles! duPont customers included Douglas Fairbanks, Jack Dempsey and Will Rogers.

Museum Collection: Gift of MBNA Corporation – Wilmington, DE

This Vehicle Adopted By Lynda & John Hodgson Kennett Square, Pennsylvania


1931 Ford Model A Sport Coupe


1930_FordModelA1931 Ford Model A Deluxe Coupe

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, MI
Model: Model A, Two Door Deluxe Coupe
Base Price: $550
Engine: Four-cylinder, 40 hp

The Model A received a significant facelift in 1930. Wider fenders, a deeper radiator shell and the elimination of the cowl stanchion contributed to its fresh look. Options for the year included an external sunvisor, a rear luggage rack, a rear-view mirror and a spare tire lock. This coupe has been restored to the judging standards of the AACA and the National Model A Club of America.

Museum Collection: Gift of Dr. and Mrs. John Stewart – Hamilton, OH

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1931-Ford-Model-A1931 Ford Model A Pickup Truck

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, MI
Model: Model A Closed cab Pickup
Base Price: $455
Engine: Four-cylinder, 40 hp

The Model A made its debut in 1928 as the replacement for the venerable, multi-million selling Model T. While its lifespan wasn’t nearly as long, the “A” sold extremely well and made its own mark in transportation history. This last-year model is one of nine different Model A truck options offered by Ford in 1931. With a price just $30 more than the less weather-resistant open cab, this version was a big seller, attracting nearly 100,000 buyers. The Model B would debut in 1932 with an optional V8 engine. This example is fully restored and bore the name-plate of Harden Furniture, the donor’s family business, which has manufactured furniture in McConnellsville, NY since 1844. This truck was given in memory of Terry O. Harden.

Museum Collection: Gift of Michael & Lisa Harden Brickey-Williamsburg, VA

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1931 Ford Model A Deluxe Tudor Sedan

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, MI
Model: Model A Tudor
Base Price: $495
Engine: Four-cylinder, 40 hp

Ford produced over 4,800,000, cars between 1927-1931. The Tudor was one of the most popular models with over 3,250,000, being produced, which went on sale December of 1927. The Model A consists of over 6,800 parts, which is almost 2,000 more parts than its predecessor, the Model T.

This particular Tudor once belonged to Bernard Healey (Mr. Howard Brodbeck’s Uncle). Uncle Bernie and this Tudor won 2nd place award in the Closed Ford category, at the Hershey car show, in 1972. Due to other car projects, Uncle Bernie sold his Tudor between 1981-82. In 2007, after Howard, completed years of research he was able to bring this Tudor back home to his Uncle. Mr. Brodbeck decided to donate the car to the museum because Uncle Bernie is a Pennsylvania Native, from Forty Fort.

Museum Collection: Gift of Howard and Cheryl Brodbeck– Goodyear, AZ

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1931-Cadillac1931 Cadillac 4 Door Town Sedan

Manufacturer: Cadillac Division of GM Detroit, MI
Model: Four-Door Town Sedan
Base Price: $2,845
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 95 hp

By the early 1930s, Cadillac had cemented its reputation as one of the nation’s premiere luxury automakers. For 1931, they offered a new body that was longer and lower than the previous year. They manufactured 10,717 cars across three model lines.

This Town Sedan was one of many different body styles built by Fisher and Fleetwood. Power came in the form of eight, twelve and sixteen-cylinder engines. This car was purchased used by the donor in 1962 for $225.00. It received a complete restoration and won an AACA National Senior Award in 1983.

Museum Collection: Gift of Don & Sally Simpson – Pompton Plains, NJ

This Vehicle Adopted By Dr. & Mrs. Clifford A. Woodbury, 3rd


1932 Studebaker Model 55 St. Regis

Manufacturer: Studebaker
Model: Model 55 Saint Regis Brougham
Base Price: $915
Engine: 230-cid L-Head,
6-Cylinder, 80 hp

There were 12 Studebaker models offered in 1932 and the St. Regis made its debut that year. By this time, safety glass was standard in all Studebaker models. The 1932
Studebaker has a special body with extremely long doors making it very easy to get into the back seats. It has a longer wheelbase at 117”. The ‘32 Studebaker was made with slanting windshields and more rounded corners. It now has a single bar front bumper. The visor over the windshield is no longer on the car.

The owner, Fred Messner, nicknamed the car “Helen” because had four sons and no daughters. Mr. Messner personally spent over five and a half years and countless hours restoring “Helen”.
This car was featured on the cover of the AACA magazine in the September/October 1990 issue. It was a multiple AACA award winner, including the Senior Award in the Fall of 1990. It has been donated to the AACA Museum by Mr. Messner’s son Don in memory of his father and is part of the Museum’s permanent collection.

Museum Collection: Gift of Donald Messner-Williamsport, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1933_Chevrolet_Roadster1933 Chevrolet Master Eagle Convertible

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Company Detroit, MI
Model: Master Eagle Series CA Convertible
Base Price: $565
Engine: Six-cylinder, 65 hp

In 1933 Chevrolet dealers sponsored the first Soap Box Derby in Dayton, Ohio. That year the company also introduced a new, “airstream” design car called the Master Eagle Series. Eight body styles comprised the line, including this sleek convertible. The Fisher Body featured a No-Draft ventilation system, highlighted by slanting hood door louvers, skirted fenders, and a beaver tail back panel. The emphasis on modern design can be seen in the airplane-style dashboard and the push-button doorlocks.

Museum Collection: Gift of Evelyn G. Norton, In Memory of Max L. Norton

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1933 Chrysler Model CO Convertible Sedan

Manufacturer: Chrysler Corporation
Model: Model CO Convertible Sedan
Base Price: $945
Engine: Six-cylinder, 224 cu. in.
83 hp

The CO series was Chrysler’s entry-level model for 1933, and the only six-cylinder car in their lineup. The five-passenger CO convertible sedan sold for $945, with total production of 207. This car is one of six known to survive.

Museum Collection: Gift of John G. Addams Estate, Mayfield Village OH

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1931-Ford-Model-A1934 Ford Model 46 Closed Cab Pickup

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, MI
Model: Model 46 Closed Cab Pickup
Base Price: $445
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 85 hp

Ford introduced its first commercial truck, the Model TT (Model T Truck) in 1917. They were late in the business; aftermarket truck bodies had been added to Model T chassis for years to meet the needs of farmers and commercial businesses. The first factory-built Ford Pickup debuted in the spring of 1926. The truck was available in both closed and open body styles. In 1ate 1932 Ford began equipping its trucks with its new flathead V8 engine. The Flathead, which would later power a generation of “hot rods” doubled the horsepower of the four-cylinder engine it replaced.

Museum Collection: Gift of Frederick G. Garttner – Garden City, NY

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1935-Brewster1935 Brewster Four Door Sedan

Manufacturer: Brewster New York, New York
Model: Four-Door Sedan (Brewster Body on a Ford Chassis)
Base Price: $3,500
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 88.5 hp

The “House of Brewster and Company” began in 1810 as a builder of high-end carriages. From 1915 to 1925 it constructed a series of elegant, extremely expensive automobiles at its plant in Long Island City, NY. The company also produced coaches for Rolls-Royce and became part of their American operation in 1926.

When Rolls ended its American production in 1934, the Brewster automobile reappeared for a two-year run. The new car, which used other manufacturer’s running gear, was attractive and more affordable than its predecessor.

Museum Collection: Gift of Henry and Susan Moody – Ellijay, Georgia

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1935-WhiteSedan1935 White Custom 703 Sedan

Manufacturer: White Company Cleveland, OH
Model: Sedan (Custom Body)
Engine: Six-cylinder, 77 hp

A prominent Boston ophthalmologist, Dr. Louisa Tingley, loved White automobiles. As a member of the corporation’s board of directors, she refused to drive anything else.

Although White stopped making cars in 1918, they built her one on special order, which she used until 1935. When it needed replacement she convinced (demanded!) White to build one more. This is the last documented White automobile. The extraordinary vehicle combined a ¾ ton White truck chassis and a cut-down Yellowstone park bus body from Bender Body Company. The Doctor used this massive sedan until her death in 1952.

This car is unrestored. It still has its original paint, interior and drivetrain.

Museum Collection: Gift of Ronald Juban – Flemington, NJ

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1936_ford_cabriolet1936 Ford Model 68DLX Cabriolet

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company – Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Model 68 Deluxe Club Cabriolet
Base Price: $675
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 85 hp

The 1936 Ford retained the same basic body of the 1935, with a new front-end and redesigned rear fenders. This deluxe model includes bright work around the grill, head lamps and built-in, dual horns. Unlike the less expensive Roadster, the V8 Cabriolet offered roll-up windows for a weather tight interior. Passengers riding in the rumble seat faced the elements on their own. This car is one of the Museum’s “stars” – it was driven by actor, Matt Damon, in the 2006 film, “The Good Shepherd.” This vehicle is one of the first donated to the Museum, given in 2001, before the Museum opened to the public. This car also has won more AACA awards than any other 1936 Ford.

Museum Gift: From Ronald Kennedy, Pinellas, FL

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1936_ford_convertible_sedan1936 Ford Deluxe Convertible Sedan

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Deluxe Convertible Sedan
Base Price: $760
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 85 hp

The 1936 Ford retained the same basic body of the 1935, with a new front-end and redesigned rear fenders. This deluxe model includes bright work around the grill, head lamps and built-in, dual horns. There were many other changes, though; steel wheels with hubcaps replaced the wire wheels that had been a standard Ford item since the late 1920s. Additionally, the Ford V8 now featured domed pistons and new insert main bearings. Although Ford offered only a single model vehicle for 1936, it was available in 18 different styles ranging from a two-passenger roadster to a four-door station wagon. Total Ford production for the year was 791,812 units.

Museum Collection: Gift of Peter Grace – Drexel Hill, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1936 Packard Sedan Convertible

Manufacturer: Packard Motor Car Co. Detroit, Michigan
Model: Convertible Sedan
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 130 hp

James Ward Packard was convinced that he could build a better vehicle than the horseless carriage he purchased in 1899. The electrical equipment manufacturer from Warren, Ohio, Packard went on to build some of the most powerful and prestigious automobiles of the period. This four-door Convertible Sedan was a new body style for 1936; it was custom built for the buyer by Dietrich. The long wheel base chassis with its eight cylinder engine made it a comfortable, competent road car. Its elegant styling and proportions make it an American classic.

Museum Collection: Gift of William Cammack – Alexandria, VA

This Vehicle Adopted By Don Schell AACA Board of Directors


1937-Fiat-Topolino-Front1937 Fiat Topolino

Manufacturer: Fiat SpA Ceirano, TurinItaly
Model: 500 A Topolino
Base Price: $550 (approximate)
Engine: Four-cylinder, 13 hp

FIAT (Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino)was founded in 1899 and has long been one of Italy’s largest industrial firms. FIAT automobiles were produced in America from 1910 to 1918 in a factory in Poughkeepsie, NY. The most familiar pre-World War II FIATs in America, however, were the 500A series built in Italy. FIAT built 122,016 Topolinos in coupe and cabriolet body styles between 1936 and 1948. Topolino translates to “little mouse,” and these cars were often referred to as “Mickey Mouse.” Many Topolinos were customized or used as drag race car bodies over the years making originals, like this example, difficult to find.

Museum Collection: Gift of Betty Rae & Jean “Mr. FIAT” Hecht
Toms River – NJ (AACA Museum Founding Sponsor, No. 124)

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1937 Packard Four Door Sedan

Manufacturer: Packard Motor Car Co. – Detroit, Michigan
Model: Four Door Sedan
Base Price: $1,235
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 120 hp

In 1937, Packard expanded its lineup to in-clude a station wagon and three new body styles, the touring coupe, the club sedan, and the touring sedan. Despite some competition from Packard’s first 6-cylinder car, the Junior Packard, the 120C was a popular and success-ful model for the Packard Company, and sold over 50,000 automobiles. Packard offered a number of options on the 120C including a ci-gar lighter. The deluxe version of the car, called the 120-CD, provided such luxuries as a clock and a deluxe radiator ornament. The 120C was also available in a seven-passenger touring car and a limousine priced in the $2,000 range.

Museum Gift: From Joseph Richmond, North Wales, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Karyn and Larry Guliano


1938_Auto_Car_Tanker-21938 Autocar Atlantic Gas Tank Truck

Manufacturer: AutoCar Ardmore, PA
Model: UD 1200 Gallon Tanker
Base Price: $4,200 (chassis only)
Engine: Six-cylinder, 38.4 hp

This style tanker was used by Atlantic Refining Company to haul refined petroleum products to their dealers. During the 1936 floods, Atlantic provided this style tanker to the community of Harrisburg at no charge to haul water.
This particular truck was rescued from a salvage yard and restored to its original condition. It is fully functional and was driven into the Museum for this exhibition. Its body was built in Pennsylvania and the 1200 gallon tank was built by the Farrell Manufacturing Company in Joliet, Illinois.

Museum Collection: Gift of Art & Fay Bruaw – St. Thomas, PA

This Vehicle is Adopted By Bill and Jay Ann Edmunds


1938-Chevrolet-Sedan1938 Chevrolet 4DR Sports Sedan

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Company Detroit, MI
Model: Four-Door Sports Sedan
Base Price: $817
Engine: Six-cylinder, 85 hp

This five passenger Sports Sedan was released to the public in late 1937. With its sleek black exterior, eye popping white wall tires (optional at the time), and graceful red pin striping the four door sedan was an instant hit. This became obvious when the production numbers jumped to 76,323.

The five passenger sedans were Chevrolets luxury cars in the late 30’s, and this was certainly a big hit. However, there is a more desirable 1938 Chevrolet out there. The 1938 Four Door Sedan Slant Back is among one of the rarest 38’s out there with only 236 ever being built.

Museum Collection: Gift of Ed Jenkins – Oberlin, Pa

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1938_Lincoln_Brunn_Convertible1938 Lincoln Series K Brunn Convertible

Manufacturer: Lincoln Motor Company – Detroit, Michigan
Model: Model K Twelve, Brunn Victoria Convertible
Base Price: $5,900
Engine: Twelve-cylinder, 150 hp

This beautiful pre-war Lincoln is one of only two in existence from a total production of eight cars. It features a custom aluminum body by the Brunn Coachworks of Buffalo, New York.
After discovering the car stored in a barn, the last private owner spent thirteen years collecting parts before undertaking a complete restoration. It has won numerous AACA awards and a prestigious “Most Elegant Pre-1940 Open Automobile” at the 1996 Councours D’Elegance of the Eastern United States.

Museum Collection: Gift of Jim & Sharon Raines – Charlotte, NC

This Vehicle Adopted by Higher Information Group


1939_American_Bantam_Roadster1939 American Bantam Model 60 Standard Coupe

Manufacturer: American Bantam Car Co. – Butler, PA
Model: Model 60 Standard Coupe
Base Price: $399
Engine: Four-cylinder, 20 hp

The Bantam was the successor to the Ameri-can Austin, built at Butler from 1930 to 1934. Both cars were small, fuel-efficient and attrac-tive in design. Bantam branded its cars with names like “Riviera” and “Hollywood” in di-rect contradiction to its shoestring budget. Per-haps Bantam’s most enduring achievement was the production of the first successful “Jeep” for the U.S. Army in 1940. The huge military con-tract, however, went to Ford and Willy’s. Ban-tam ended car production in 1941.

Museum Gift: From William Cammack

This Vehicle Adopted By William J Cammack Supporting Org. Alexandria, Virginia


1939-American-Bantam-Coupe1939 American Bantam Model 60 Roadster

Manufacturer: American Bantam Car Co. Butler, Pa
Model: Model 60 Roadster
Base Price: $499
Engine: Four-cylinder, 20 hp

The Bantam was the successor to the Ameri-can Austin, built at Butler from 1930 to 1934. Both cars were small, fuel-efficient and attrac-tive in design. Bantam branded its cars with names like “Riviera” and “Hollywood” in di-rect contradiction to its shoestring budget. Per-haps Bantam’s most enduring achievement was the production of the first successful “Jeep” for the U.S. Army in 1940. The huge military con-tract, however, went to Ford and Willy’s. Ban-tam ended car production in 1941.

Museum Gift: From William Cammack

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1939_Studebaker_President_Sedan

1939 Studebaker President 4DR Sedan


1939_Ford_Sedan1939 Ford 91A Deluxe 4DR Sedan

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company – Dearborn, MI
Model: 91A, Deluxe Fordor Sedan
Base Price: $790
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 85 hp

Ford redesigned its cars in 1937, mounting the headlights in the front fenders for the first time. The 1939 model was basically a carryover of this two year old design. Customers could choose from a Standard 922 series or the Deluxe 91A line as represented by this restored sedan. Most Standard Fords were delivered with a 65 hp version of the flathead V8. The Deluxe models came with an 85 hp engine as standard equipment. All models for 1939 received one major technical development: the adoption by Ford of Lockheed hydraulic brakes.

This Ford is one of several cars donated by the Pittman family.

This Vehicle Adopted By Vesta Pittman Chambersburg, Pennsylvania


1939_International_Pickup_Truck1939 Int’l Harvester Pickup Truck

Manufacturer: International Harvester Co. Chicago, Illinois
Model: D2 1/2 Ton Truck
Base Price: $583
Engine: Six-cylinder, 78 hp

International Harvester Company was formed in 1902 as a result of the McCormick Harvesting Machine Company’s merger with four other farm equipment machine firms. The Museum owns two examples of its early work: a circa 1905 Horse-Drawn Wagon and a 1907 Model B “High Wheeler” automobile. From 1911 to 1980, IHC produced light trucks. In 1937 they redesigned their line giving the trucks an all steel body and engines with full pressure lubrication. The trucks were as modern as any built during the Depression years. This example was restored locally by Steve Harclerode of Harclerode’s Repair in Cleona, PA. Partial funding was provided by the vehicle’s donor with Steve contributing many hours of his own time to the project.

Museum Collection: Gift of John W. Harrison – Rexford, NY

This Vehicle Adopted By John W. Harrison Rexford, New York

1940-1949

1941_Chevrolet_Convertible1941 Chevrolet Special Deluxe Convertible

Manufacturer: Chevrolet, Div. General Motors Corp. – Detroit, MI
Model: Special Deluxe Convertible Coupe
Base Price: $1,080
Engine: Six-cylinder, 90 hp

In 1941 Chevrolet introduced a completely new body. Concealed safety steps replaced the traditional running boards. These changes would continue through the post-war models up to 1948. They also improved the existing six-cylinder engine for additional horsepower. Chevrolet and other General Motors cars offered shortwave radios as a factory option.
This convertible has a long list of factory options. The 1941 body style would continue through early 1942 when production ended due to World War II. The same style would re-emerge in 1946 with the post-War models.

Museum Collection: Gift of MBNA America – Wilmington, DE

This Vehicle Adopted By Toni and David Rothman AACA Board of Directors


1941-Ford-11941 Ford Super Deluxe Station Wagon

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Super Deluxe “Woody” Station Wagon
Base Price: $1,015
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 90 hp

Can you imagine this mammoth coming down the road this day in age? With a 114 inch wheel base and a newly designed body, which made the car a heavy piece of machinery. It needed something special under its hood, so the car was equipped with a eight-cylinder, 221 cubic inch engine that produced around 90 horsepower. To go along with that, the newly styled front end wasn’t such a success. This new design pushed the headlights further apart, gave it more curvy fenders, and a three piece grill. Production numbers were not a hit with the company so a new design was proposed and put into production in 1942. That makes this 1941 a one year production design.

Museum Collection: Gift of Carol Claypoole

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1941_Lincoln_ambulance1941 Lincoln Zephyr Ambulance

Manufacturer: Lincoln Motor Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: Zephyr Four-Door Limo (Ambulance)
Base Price: Not known
Engine: Twelve-cylinder, 120 hp

This Lincoln began its interesting life as a four-door, 7-passenger limo. Converted to an ambulance, it saw duty in California during the 1940s and 50s. Lincoln Zephyrs were available with custom bodies and interiors making them easily adaptable for specialized tasks. Retired from active duty, this ambulance appeared in several motion pictures. Only 295 limo-bodied Lincoln Zephyrs were built in 1941; this may be the only surviving ambulance.

Museum Collection: Gift of MBNA America – Wilmington, DE

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1941-Packard-Clipper1941 Packard Clipper

Manufacturer: Packard Motor Car Co.
Model: 19th Series Clipper
Base Price: $1,420
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 125 hp

The 1941 Packard Clipper was one of the last cars built by Packard before it shifted to military production for the war effort. Built on a 120 chassis, the car featured a smoothly curved modern body, drawn by noted designer Howard “Dutch” Darrin. His design molded body and fenders into a dramatic flowing shape that contrasted sharply with the traditional design themes. Developed to compete with the Cadillac 61 series, the Clipper outsold Cadillac in 1941. After the war, Packard resurrected this design for the 1946 and 1947 model years.

Museum Collection: Gift of MBNA Corporation – Wilmington, DE

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1941-Crosley-Convertible1941 Crosley Convertible Sedan

Manufacturer: Crosley Motors, Inc. – Cincinnati, Ohio
Model: Convertible Sedan
Base Price: $390
Engine: Two-cylinder, 12 hp

In 1922 Powel Crosley was the largest producer of radios in the world. His company also manufactured electrical appliances, including the famed “Shelvador” refrigerator. He de-signed his car primarily as economical transportation over short distances. Weighing between 975 and 1,160 pounds, they were guaranteed to get 50 miles on a gallon of gas and attain a speed of 50 mph. While his cars were appreciated during the gas rationing of World War II, America would not truly embrace sub-compact cars until the 1970s.

Museum Gift: From William J. Cammack Supporting Org, Alexandria, VA

This Vehicle Adopted By William J Cammack Supporting Org. Alexandria, Virginia


1941_Crosley_Station_Wagon1941 Corosley Station Wagon

Manufacturer: Crosley Motors, Inc. – Cincinnati, Ohio
Model: Station Wagon
Base Price: $496
Engine: Two-cylinder, 12 hp

In 1922 Powel Crosley was the largest produc-er of radios in the world. His company also manufactured electrical appliances, including the famed “Shelvador” refrigerator. He de-signed his car primarily as economical trans-portation over short distances. Weighing be-tween 975 and 1,160 pounds, they were guar-anteed to get 50 miles on a gallon of gas and attain a speed of 50 mph. While his cars were appreciated during the gas rationing of World War II, America would not truly embrace sub-compact cars until the 1970s.

Museum Gift: From William J. Cammack Supporting Org, Alexandria, VA

This Vehicle Adopted By William J Cammack Supporting Org. Alexandria, Virginia


1941 Mercury Series 19A Station Wagon

Manufacturer: Mercury – Dearborn, MI
Model: Series 19A, Station Wagon
Base Price: $1,141
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 95 hp

The Mercury was introduced in 1939 as Ford’s mid-level line, priced to compete with Pontiac and Oldsmobile. Edsel Ford took the lead in developing the line, naming it after the fleet-footed messenger of the gods. Although early Mercury’s were frequently viewed as up-scale Fords, brisk performance helped the car achieve a dedicated following. The line attained a stronger identity after World War II with the establishment of the Lincoln-Mercury Division.

Museum Gift: From William J. Cammack Supporting Org, Alexandria, VA

This Vehicle Adopted By William J Cammack Supporting Org. Alexandria, Virginia


1942_Ford_Army_Jeep1942 Ford GPW Military “Jeep”

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company
Dearborn, MI
Model: GPW Military “Jeep”
Base Price: Not sold to public
Engine: Four-cylinder, 60 hp

In the late 1930s, the U.S. military foresaw the need for a light scout vehicle to replace its aging Model Ts. American Bantam, Ford Motor Co. and Willys-Overland submitted designs and built prototype vehicles for testing. By 1941 the War Dept. had awarded the final contract to the Willy’s MB; however, war demand proved too great and Ford was also contracted to produce the Willy’s under the name GPW (General Purpose—Willy’s Design). This vehicle, later called the “Jeep” became one of WWII’s most iconic symbols. All told, Willys produced 363,000 units, Ford 280,000; about 51,000 were exported to Russia under the Lend-Lease program. This example was restored by the donor and his grandson.

Museum Collection Gift of Lloyd Riggs – Walnut Creek, CA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1945_HarleyDavidson_HighwayPatrol1945 Harley Davidson Police Special

Manufacturer: Harley-Davidson USA
Kansas City, KS
Model: Police Special
Base Price: Approximately $650
Engine: Two-cylinder, 48 hp

When 21-year old William S. Harley and his 20-year old friend Arthur Davidson made available to the public the first Harley-Davidson motorcycle in 1903, they could not possibly know the impact their company would have on transportation in the 20th century. Today the term “Harley” is synonymous with “American Motorcycle.” Over the last 100 years, the company has produced motorcycles for the general public, military and law enforcement. This motorcycle is a genuine California Highway Patrol vehicle, documented by the CHP as the only remaining 1945 model. It was restored to award winning status in 1993. The vehicle’s donor, Lloyd Riggs, was the first President of the AACA Museum.

Museum Collection Gift of Lloyd Riggs – Walnut Creek, CA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1946 Fruehauf Trailer


1946 Whizzer Motor Bike

Manufacturer: Whizzer Motor Company Pontiac, Michigan
Model: Motor Bike
Base Price: $97.55
Engine: Four-cycle, 138 cc, 2.5 hp

Whizzer marketed its bikes as cheap every-day transportation, as well as ideal for longer trips. 1946 was the first year of production af-ter WWII, and was originally sold in kit form to be mounted on the buyer’s bicycle. Original-ly purchased used on a Dixie Flyer frame, Mr. O’Keefe later installed it on a Schwinn frame. Top speed is 35 mph, while getting 125 miles per gallon!

Museum Donation: Gift of Michael & Mary O’Keefe – Louisville, KY

This Vehicle is Adopted by Kyana Region AACA Louisville, Kentucky


1947 Morris Garages (MG) TC


1947 Cushman Motor Scooter 50

Manufacturer: Cushman Motor Works Inc. Lincoln, Nebraska
Model: Series 50
Base Price: $240
Engine: One-cylinder, 4 hp

Only two colors were offered on the 1947 models—red and blue. This was the first year that the new Cushman Disc Type Automatic Clutch was made standard, which engaged automatically when the engine was accelerated. The clutch was an extra $20 for the buyer. Also in 1947, Cushman introduced the Ice Cream Special Chassis. This all white model was intended to be bought by ice cream vendors who would then install their own insulated box. This particular scooter has been restored.

Museum Collection Gift of Hollis C. Henderson – Lincolnton, NC

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1948_MG_TC.photo-21948 MG Model TC

Manufacturer: MG (Morris Garages) England
Model: TC
Base Price: $2,200
Engine: Four-cylinder, 54 hp

The first MG sports car appeared in the 1930s. Pre-World War II production totaled about 22,500 cars. When the TC debuted in 1945 it ushered in a new love of sports cars that would bloom in the 1950s. American servicemen, particularly those returning from England, took a liking to these roadsters and brought back quite a few when they returned home. By 1947, MG had an expanding distribution network in the States.

Museum Collection: Courtesy of Jack Sullivan – Venice, FL

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1948 Higgins Travel Trailer


1948 Whizzer Motor Bike

Manufacturer: Whizzer Motor Company Pontiac, Michigan
Model: Pacemaker Motor Bike
Base Price: $199.50
Engine: Four-cycle, 138 cc, 2.5 hp

Whizzer marketed its bikes as cheap every-day transportation, as well as ideal for longer trips. For $97.55, the Whizzer motor could be bought separately and installed on any balloon tired bicycle. The Pacemaker, however, was promoted as “the first complete motorbike.” It used a Schwinn chassis and the standard Whizzer motor.

This motor bike was restored to show winning condition by its last private owners. It includes many options such as a chrome side cover and a luggage rack.

Museum Collection: Gift of Paul & Elizabeth Eppley – Springfield, VA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1949 Chevrolet 4DR Fleetline Sedan

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: Fleetline Deluxe 4 door sedan
Base Price: $1,529.00
Engine: Six-cylinder ohv 216 cu in 90 hp @3,300 rpm

For 1949, Chevrolet offered 14 models, in two lines called Fleetline (fastback) and Styleline (bustleback), with most body styles available in both Deluxe and Special editions. With calendar sales totaling over 1.1 million units in 1949, Chevrolet was once again America’s Number One automaker.

This car was purchased new in East Glacier Park, Montana by Glenn and Shirley Smiley, who affectionately nicknamed it “Chevykins”. They used it for many years and never garaged it, getting buried under several feet of snow during the harsh winters. The donors acquired the car in 2002 with all its original equipment and fully restored Chevykins to her former glory.

Museum Donation: Gift of Robert & Marion Jacobs- Mount Joy, PA

This Vehicle is Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.

1950-1959

1950 Chevrolet 2DR Sport Coupe

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Co. - Detroit, Michigan
Model: Two-Door Sport Coupe
Base Price: $1,498
Engine: Six-cylinder, 90 hp

Chevrolet entered the post World War II era with warmed-over versions of its 1942 models. A car-starved public didn’t care and by 1947 Chevrolet had resumed its position as America’s best selling automotive manufacturer, a title it would hold almost uninterruptedly for the next three decades.

An all new Chevrolet lineup was introduced in 1949. It was conservatively styled and rugged-ly-built. Styling remained the same for the 1950 models. This Sport Coupe is part of the Deluxe line featuring an upgraded interior and extensive stainless steel trim work. This one-owner car was “retired” to the AACA Museum in 2005.

Museum Gift: From Boo Law, Bethesda, MD

This Vehicle Adopted By Boo Law Bethesda, Maryland


1950 Lincoln 2DR Coupe


1950-Jaguar-Mark-V-Drophead1950 Jaguar Mark V Drophead

Manufacturer: Jaguar Cars Ltd. Coventry, England
Model: Mark V Drophead Coupe
Base Price: $3,850
Engine: Six-cylinder, 125 hp

Fancy, fancy, fancy. That’s all one would think if you arrived at a gathering in this gold 1950 Jaguar Drophead Coupe. A total of 977 of these luxurious beauties were built in 1950, and of that 977, around 840 were marked for export. So, you could say that this is a very rare auto-mobile, and even would have been then.

This particular style of Drophead was designed in 1949, and also used in 1950. Production of the Drophead was discontinued after the end of 1950. A short run of only two years, but a success. The Mark V bodies were produced by Pressed Steel Ltd.

Museum Collection: Gift of David Cammack – Alexandria, VA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1951_Ford_F2_PickupTruck1951 Ford F-2 Pickup

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: F-2 Pickup
Base Price: $1,490
Engine: Six-cylinder, 95 hp

Ford introduced its F Series of trucks in 1948. After more than fifty years, the series remains the staple of Ford’s light truck line. Advertising claimed the line was “bonus built.” The new trucks ranged from the half-ton F-1 pickup to the three-ton F-8. The F-2, seen here, is the ¾ ton version. The 1951 model year brought new styling and added features across the entire F-series of Ford light trucks. Extra-cost options for the interior such as heavy-duty vinyl seating, three way air control and full gauges were offered in an attempt to attract additional buyers. This example was completely restored by the donor.

Museum Collection: Gift of John Klepser – Greencastle, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1952_Crosley_Farm-O-Road1952 Crosley Farm-O-Road

Manufacturer: Crosley Motors Inc. – Cincinatti, Ohio
Model: Farm-O-Road
Base Price: $900 (estimated)
Engine: Four-cylinder, 25.5 hp

In 1922 Powel Crosley was the largest producer of radios in the world. His company also manufactured electrical appliances, including the famed “Shelvador” refrigerator. In 1939 he started an automobile company, producing lightweight, economical cars and trucks, de-signed primarily for inner-city use.
The Farm-O-Road, which debuted in 1950 came as a utility pickup or dump body and was particularly useful on the farm. America was not yet ready to embrace fuel-efficient vehicles and Crosley Motors ended production in 1952.

Museum Gift: From William J. Cammack Supporting Org, Alexandria, VA

This Vehicle Adopted By William J Cammack Supporting Org. Alexandria, Virginia


1952-Studebaker-Convertible-41952 Studebaker Commander Convertible

Manufacturer: Studebaker Corporation South Bend, Indiana
Model: Commander Convertible
Base Price: $2,548
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 120 hp

Nineteen fifty two marked the centennial of the Studebaker Corporation; they were one of a handful of wagon builders to succeed in the automobile business. New models were planned for 1953.

In the meantime the dated 1947 designs received a final face-lift. The bullet-shaped, airplane inspired front end was replaced by a ‘clam-digger’ grille. There were 1,715 Commander Convertibles built in 1952.
This vehicle was given to the Museum by MBNA Corporation in recognition of William H. Smith’s service as Executive Director of the Antique Automobile Club of America.

Museum Collection: Gift of MBNA Corporation – Wilmington, DE

This Vehicle Adopted By Keystone Region Chapter Inc. Studebaker Drivers Club Inc.


1953-Kaiser-Manhattan-Coupe1953 Kaiser Manhattan 2DR Sedan

Manufacturer: Kaiser Sales Corporation Willow Run, MI
Model: Manhattan Two-Door Sedan
Base Price: $2,650
Engine: Six-cylinder, 115 hp

Kaiser was a new automobile company that started production after World War II. It made cars in America from 1947 to 1955. Kaiser’s passenger car business was in decline by 1953. The company responded by eliminating body styles and giving new models minor, styling changes, such as the addition of a chrome strip on the top of the rear fenders to create miniature tailfins. Promotional materials of the time touted the car’s oversize, self-centering brakes, Safety-First lighting and wraparound bumpers.

This Kaiser is one of several cars donated by the Pittman family.

Museum Collection: Gift of Sylvester & Vesta Pittman – Chambersburg, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Vesta Pittman Chambersburg, Pennsylvania


1953-Studebaker-Turntable1953 Studebaker Commander Starline

Manufacturer: Studebaker Corporation – South Bend, Indiana
Model: Commander Starliner
Base Price: $2,127
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 120 hp

For 1953 Studebaker introduced the new Raymond Loewy designs. The “Loewy Coupes” as they have come to be called were praised by the automotive press as works of art. These cars pioneered the low to the ground, long hood, short deck design years before it became popular. Clean and simple, the car stood apart from the chrome laden machines produced by America’s other automobile manufacturers. This car is unrestored with less than 3,000 miles on its odometer.

This vehicle was given to the Museum by MBNA Corporation in recognition of William H. Smith’s service as Executive Director of the Antique Automobile Club of America.

Museum Collection: Gift of From MBNA in recognition of William Smith’s

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


Vette1954 Chevrolet Corvette

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Co. – Detroit, Michigan
Model: Corvette
Base Price: $2,774
Engine: Six-cylinder, 150 hp

The Corvette legend began when General Motors introduced the Chevrolet as a concept car at the 1953 New York Motorama. The Corvette was low and sleek, inspired by the two-seat sports cars produced in Europe. It was unlike any other American car of its day and stood in stark contrast to the family-oriented vehicles being mass-produced by Chevrolet. Initial model year production in 1953 was limited to 300 units, all finished in white. The car remained virtually unchanged for 1954, although a few were finished in other colors.

This pristine example is a unique and rare car. It has very low mileage and is one of about six to be factory finished in black.

Museum Collection: Gift of Richard Ullman – Wayne, NJ

This Vehicle Adopted By Darwin Clark, AACA Board of Directors


1954_Chevrolet_StationWagon1954 Chevrolet 210 Station Wagon

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: Station Wagon Special 210
Base Price: $2,133
Engine: Six-cylinder, 115 hp

Sedan-based station wagons were popular family cars during the 1950s. Major manufacturers offered station wagons in all their model lines and trim levels. Buyers choosing 1954 Chevrolet wagons like this 210 could order power windows, power steering, and power brakes, the first time such options were available on an American production car. They could also select from 13 single-tone body colors and 11 two-tone combinations. The eight-millionth Chevrolet was built during the 1954 model run.

This Chevrolet is one of several cars donated by the Pittman family.

Museum Collection: Gift of Sylvester & Vesta Pittman – Chambersburg, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Vesta Pittman Chambersburg, PA


1954_MG_TF1954 Morris Garages (MG) TF Roadster

Manufacturer: MG (Morris Garage) England
Model: TF Roadster
Base Price: $2,330 (approximate)
Engine: Four-cylinder, 57 hp

The The first MG sports car appeared in the 1930s. Pre-World War II production totaled about 22,500 cars. When the TC debuted in 1945 it ushered in a new love of sports cars that would bloom in the 1950s. American servicemen, particularly those returning from England, took a liking to these roadsters and brought back quite a few when they returned home. The TF, introduced in 1954, was a slightly restyled version of the previous TD roadster. MG had an expanding distribution network in the States through the early 1970s. The company manufactured 512,880 vehicles before ending production in 1980.

Museum Collection: Gift of B. & Kathleen Lynch – Eagle Rock, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Bob & Chris Vitrikas Barbowsville, VA


1955-Flajole-Forerunner-Exterior1955 Flajole 2DR Sports Coupe (Custom)

Manufacturer: Bill Flajole
Model: Forerunner Custom Design
Base Price: Over $80,000
Engine/Chassis: 3.4 Liter Six-Cylinder, 180 HP Jaguar, XK 120M

As one of the most innovative concept cars of the 1950’s, the Flajole Forerunner was world renowned stylist Bill Flajole’s vision of the future. The Forerunner was the result of over 7,000 hours of design and construction, and over $80,000 in build cost in 1955 dollars; a significant investment at the time.

The subject of numerous magazine articles, Motor Trend featured the Forerunner on the same cover as Ghia’s groundbreaking Gilda design study in September 1955. Sports Cars Illustrated gave the Forerunner a three-page feature article in October 1955, Mechanix Illustrated wrote about the car in September of 1955, and the car was also recently featured in Octane Magazine.

Museum Collection: Gift of Mark Hyman-Hyman LTD. Classic Cars

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1956_Continental_MarkII1956 Continental Mark II

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Co. Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Continental Mark II
Base Price: $9,966
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 300 hp

The Continental Mark II was Ford’s attempt to revive a successful nameplate from the 1940s. Edsel Ford commissioned the original Continental as a styling exercise. Well-received by Ford’s circle of friends, the Continental went into production as a Lincoln in 1941. Never labeled as a Lincoln, the Continental Mark II shared the original’s long-hood-short-deck proportions and its high per-unit building cost. Much of the car was literally hand-crafted. Priced far above its Cadillac competition, Ford ceased production of the dramatically styled coupe after only 2500 had been built.

Museum Collection: Gift of Nancy Ransom – Washington, D.C.

This Vehicle Adopted By AACA Kyana Region Kentucky


1957-Chevy-Windingo1957 Chevrolet 210 Race Car

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: 210 Sedan (custom race car)
Base Price: n/a
Engine: Eight-cylinder, est. 500 hp

The 1957 Chevrolet is an automotive icon. It is a favorite of restorers and customizers the world over and a staple and virtually any car show or cruise-in across America. It turns out the ’57 also makes a good base for building a potent race car! This 210 was purchased as a shell and purpose built to compete in the LaCarrera Pan-American Race, an historical revival of the legendary 2,500 mile, 8-day race of the 1950s. It successfully completed the grueling race 10 times in a row, with best finishes of fourth, second and first. It is seen here in the condition it finished its last race. The Donor, James B. Gubelmann, was in the now-retired Windigo Racing Team.

Museum Collection: Gift of James B. Gubelmann, Morristown, NJ

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1957 Chevrolet 210 4DR Station Wagon

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: 210 Station-Wagon
Base Price: $2,467
Engine: Six-cylinder, 140 hp

The 1957 Chevrolet is an automotive icon. It is a favorite of restorers and customizers the world over and a staple and virtually any car show or cruise-in across America. Buyers could chose from many different body styles and trim levels equipped with either the “Blue Flame” six cylinder or 265 cubic inch V8 engines. This six-passenger wagon is a “210” or midline model, one of 8 models offered in the series. It was purchased used in March of 1959 by the donor’s parents for $1761.50.It has been faithfully maintained by the family up until its 2010 donation to the Museum. It retains nearly all of its original components, but was repainted in its factory color.

Museum Collection: Gift of Cheryl Marks – Haddon Heights, NJ

This Vehicle Adopted By Ralph Fetrow in honor of Wes Fetrow Carlisle, PA


1957_Thunderbird_black1957 Ford Thunderbird

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, MI
Model: Thunderbird
Base Price: $3,408
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 300 hp

Designed to compete with Chevrolet’s Corvette, Ford’s Thunderbird was more sporty cruiser than serious sports car. Despite its powerful V-8 engine and sleek silhouette, the T-bird was more at home on the boulevard than the racetrack. This model sports a dealer-installed Paxton super charger, along with an electronically adjustable “memory seat.” For 1958, Ford redesigned the Thunderbird as a four-passenger “sports luxury car.”

The 2002 revival of the Thunderbird, with its port-hole hardtop and pointed front bumpers, is based on the 1955-1957 models.

Museum Collection: Gift of Albert J. Mitchell – Pitman, NJ 
This Vehicle Adopted By West Texas Region Midland, Texas
www.wtraacaclassicmemories.com/


1958 Cushman Motor Scooter

Manufacturer: Cushman Motor Works Lincoln, Nebraska
Model: Eagle Motor Scooter
Base Price: $360
Engine: One-cylinder, 4.8 hp

The Eagle had several new features to make it the most appealing model of their 1958 line. It had a smaller transmission, a clutch release rod instead of a cable, and a large clutch pulley. These changes were all supposed to make shifting easier and smoother. Cushman also advertised the Eagle’s new floorboard, which hid the wiring and cables that in earlier models, had been exposed.
This example was restored by its last private owner. It was given to the Museum in memory of John B. Barnard.

Museum Collection: Gift of Mr. & Mrs. John B. Barnard

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1958_Zundapp_Motorcycle

1958 Zundapp Hortex Motorcycle


1958 Int’l Harvester Truck (Semi-)


1958-Lincoln1959 Lincoln Capril 4DR Hardtop Sedan

Manufacturer: Chrysler Corp. Detroit, MI
Model: Capri
Base Price: $5,090
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 350 hp

With the 1959 production year looming, Lincoln was looking for a changed. So why not the Capri? They wanted a change, so that’s what they did. Although there were some changes, the horsepower rating on the 430 cubic inch engine decreased 25 horsepower from the previous year (375 to 350.)

The company decided that the canted headlights should be incorporated into the grilles, and they also made the side chrome moldings more gaudier. The lower quarter was also covered with brushed aluminum, and followed on top by a spear running toward the front of the car. All new to the Lincoln in 1959.

Museum Collection: Gift of Michael Sauta –Milford, NH

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1959_MGA1959 Morris Garages (MG) MGA Roadster

Manufacturer: MG Car Co. Ltd. Cowley, Oxford– England
Model: MGA Roadster
Base Price: $2,462
Engine: Four-cylinder, 72 hp

In 1959, MG produced two models of the MGA. Theses were the coupe and the roadster. They also sold a twin-cam MGA, but very few were built. This particular MGA is a two-door roadster.
The model MGA was coined after the MGA group was introduced at the October London Motor Show in late 1956.

Museum Collection: Gift of Anthony & Guy Moscato—Emporium, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1959_Pontiac_StarCheifSedan1959 Pontiac Star Chief 4DR Hardtop Sedan

Manufacturer: Pontiac Motor Division Detroit – MI
Model: Star Chief Sedan
Base Price: $3,005
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 245 hp

Pontiac was introduced by General Motors in 1926 as a companion car to its Oakland brand. Pontiac quickly outsold its sibling, which led to the demise of Oakland. By the 1950s, Pontiac was a staple in the GM lineup and the Star Chief was a mainstay in the full-size line. The last year of the decade saw extravagant, and different, tailfins for each of GM’s brands. This element would largely disappear in the 1960 Pontiac. This Star Chief sedan was purchased new by the donor and her husband. It features period installed aftermarket air conditioning and has approximately 80,000 miles. It is virtually 100 percent original. It was removed from the donor’s garage in 2007 where it had resided, protected but unused, since 1980. It was brought back to life by the Museum’s volunteers.

Museum Collection: Gift of Marjorie Hadlock – Alexandria, VA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1959 Vespa Allstate Cruisair Scooter

Manufacturer: Piaggio Company Pontedera, Italy
Model: Super Cruisaire
Base Price: $265
Engine: One-cylinder, 5 hp

Sears, Roebuck and Company earned its reputation selling practically every product ever manufactured. Its sales line ranged from buttons to pre-fabricated housing. In 1951 they purchased 1,000 Vespa scooters as a sales experiment. The “experiment” proved successful and Sears placed an ongoing monthly order for 2,000 units. Tens of thousands of Allstates were sold through 1963. The Allstate Cruisaire and other Allstate Vespas are essentially rebadged versions of their parent models. The elimination of the Vespa front wheel shock absorber is the only significant change made by Sears.

Museum Collection: Gift of Richard Paprocki – Queens, NY

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.

1960-1969

1960 Ford Thunderbird HT (Stainless Steel)

1960_FordThunderbirdHTManufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Thunderbird
Base Price: Not Applicable
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 300 hp

In 1935 Allegheny Ludlum Steel Division and the Ford Motor Company collaborated on an experiment to showcase the attributes of stainless steel. Together, they built six stainless steel bodied 1936 Ford Deluxe Sedans. Each of these cars logged at least 200,000 miles and four still exist.
The experiment continued in 1960 with two Thunderbirds and again, for a final time in 1967 with three Lincoln Convertibles. Aside from the body, the Stainless Steel Thunderbird retains all the standard 1960 components. Weight for the two cars is about the same. Allegheny has retained at least one copy of each model, which they occasionally loan to museums for public display.

Museum Loan: Courtesy of ATI Allegheny Ludlum – Pittsburgh, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By ATI Allegheny Ludlum Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


1960 Harley-Davidson Topper Scooter

Manufacturer: Harley-Davidson
Model: Topper Scooter
Base Price: $450.00
Engine: Single-cylinder, 9 hp

Tops them all in Beauty and Performance . . . it’s the Topper!” In 1960 Harley-Davidson joined the scooter business with their Topper Motor Scooter. This two-seater was ahead of the game with its Scootaway automatic transmission and horizontal one-cylinder engine. With the Scootaway transmission there wasn’t a need for a clutch or to shift, just get on it and go, making it a joy for anyone to ride. With a top speed of 45 mph, this 10 cubic inch, horizontally mounted engine had a stated range of 100 miles per gallon on a 1.7 gallon tank. This scooter is Strato Blue and Birch White (only color available) and weighs 237 pounds.

Museum Collection: Gift of Julian and Becky Griffin – Burlington, NC

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1961_Chevrolet_CorvairTruck

1961 Chevrolet Corvair Truck


1962_Honda_150CABenly1962 Honda CA95 (Benly) Touring 150

Manufacturer: Honda Tokyo, Japan
Model: CA95 (Benly) Touring 150 (Early)
Base Price:
Engine: 154cc w/ single carburetor

The Honda CA95 was sometimes referred to as “Baby Dream.” The Baby Dream was produced in two different models, the first model being produced from 1959-1963, and the later model being produced from 1963-1966. The early model has a short rear fender brake, which the late model does not have. Now, the Baby Dream is considered a classic and hard to find.

The Honda CA95 has a square head light with an integrated speedometer. The fuel tank has small rubber kneepads and a large chrome panel. The ear-ly model has a small taillight, an enclosed drive chain, and blackwall tires and flat mufflers.

In 1999, this motorcycle won its first AACA Junior Award, and in 2001 won the AACA Senior Grand National Award.

Museum Collection: Gift of Paul & Jan-Gee McCollam– Glastonbury, CT.

This Vehicle is Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1963 Cadillac Sedan DeVille 4Dr. HT


1963-Pontiac_TempestConvertible1963 Pontiac Tempest/LeMans Convertible

Manufacturer: Pontiac Motor Division Detroit, MI
Model: Tempest/LeMans Custom Convertible.
Base Price: $2,742
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 260 hp

The Tempest made its debut in 1961 with an innovative drivetrain featuring a rear-mounted modified Corvair transaxle.

Museum Collection: Gift of Douglas W. Bennett – Raleigh, NC

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1963-Volkswagon-Beetle1963 Volkswagen Beetle (Bug)

Manufacturer: Volkswagenwerk AG Wolfsburg, Germany
Model: 113 Type 1
Base Price: $1,595
Engine: Four-cylinder, 40 hp

The Beetle development is closely tied to Dr. Ferdinand Porsche. After WWI he made several attempts to create a small economical car for the general public, but it wasn’t until he was directed by the German powers of 1934 that his idea came to fruition. The first prototypes were created in 1936, with the final versions ready in 1938. These original cars were named KdF-Wagens.After WWII the factory came under British control, and returned to German administration in 1949.
The first Beetles were imported to America in 1949. Just two were sold. The “Bug” featured a rear-mounted, air-cooled engine. The gas tank held 10.6 gallons; advertised average fuel economy was 31 mpg.

This Beetle arrived in the United States in June of 1963. It was sold through the Kelly Motor Company in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

Museum Collection: Gift of John G. Ludwig – Scranton, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1965_Chevrolet_CorvairCorsaTurboConvertible1965 Chevrolet Corvair Corsa Turbo

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: Corvair Corsa Turbo
Base Price: $2,608
Engine: Six-Cylinder, 180 hp

The Corvair was a very unconventional automobile when it was introduced as a 1960 model. It was powered by an aluminum, air-cooled, horizontally-opposed engine, rear-mounted, like the VW Beatle.Underneath, it featured a fully independent suspension with coil springs. The original Corvair won Motor Trend magazine’s Car of the Year award. Unfortunately it reputation was tarnished when questions concerning its handling qualities inspired Ralph Nader to write Unsafe at Any Speed, a scathing attack on the American auto industry that led to a new era of government regulation that continues to this day.

Museum Collection: Gift from Frank Vilk– Newport, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1965_FordMustang1965 Ford Mustang Convertible

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Mustang Convertible
Base Price: $2,557.54
Engine: Six-cylinder, 120 hp

America’s “Pony Car,” the Mustang debuted on April 17th, 1964 at the New York World’s Fair. It was an instant success, selling 500,000 units in less than 18 months. Mustang offered sporty performance at an affordable price. Options included three different body styles – coupe, convertible and 2 + 2 fastback (beginning in 1966) – and power plants ranging from a base fuel efficient six cylinder to a high performance V-8. The 1965 -1966 cars are what most people visualize when referring to the “classic Mustang.” This car was restored in 2009-2010 by students from the Collision Repair Technology curriculum at PA College of Technology in Williamsport, PA with funding from the Susquehannock Region of the AACA.

Museum Collection: Gift of Clifton C. Emich – Ruxton, MD

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1965-MGB1965 Morris Garages (MG) MGB Convertible

Manufacturer: Morris Garages (MG), Abingdon, England
Model: MGB
Engine: 1798cc (1.8L) In-Line 4 Horse Power: 95 @ 5400 RPM
Transmission: Four-speed manual; non-synchromesh first gear (overdrive optional)

William Morris started Morris Garages in 1910 with the first Morris car going into production three years later. The MG’s
octagon badge first appeared in the 1920s on special bodied Morris cars.

The MGB was introduced in 1962 replacing the MGA which, up to then, was the best selling sports car of its time (total production 101,081). When introduced the MGB was expected to have a 5-year production life; however it continued to be made until 1980. During those 18 years a total of 386,961 roadsters and 125,282 GTs (a coupe that was introduced in 1966) were produced.

Although the only change in actual designation during this period was the MARK II, discussions of the MGB’s life cycle often break it down to four periods: Mark I (1962-1967); Mark II (1967-1969); Mark III (1969-1974); and “rubber bumper”
(1974-1980) (so called due to the necessity to replace the chrome bumpers with impact absorbing steel bumpers covered with polyurethane to meet Federally mandated bumper standards).

Purchased new, the donor of this MGB used it as a “daily driver” until 1974. At that time the engine was rebuilt, an overdrive transmission from a 1967 MGB was installed, and it was repainted in its original British Racing Green color. Although “retired” in 1975, it continued to be driven on an occasional basis accumulating nearly 106,000 miles at the time of its donation in 2011.

Museum Collection: Gift of James Bartlett, Hummelstown, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1965 Skat-Kitty Mini-Bike

Manufacturer: Projects Unlimited, Inc. Dayton, Ohio
Model: Mini Scooter
Base Price: $179.95
Engine: Four-cycle, 2.5 hp

This knee-high motor scooter was one of the smallest minibikes on the market in the 1960s. It was licensable for street use and became an instant hit with Shrine units for parades. In fact, many are still in use by Shriners cross the country. The Skat-Kitty was available through the Sears Catalog, while an updated version with more chrome was offered in the S & H Greenstamp Book. These scooters ranged in price from approximately $170 to $300, depending on engine and accessories that included a side car, electric horn kit and canvas cover.

Museum Loan: Courtesy of Jeanne Smith, Middletown, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Bill and Jeanne Smith, Middletown, Pennsylvania


1965-Lincoln-Continental1965 Lincoln Continental 4DR Convertible

Manufacturer: Lincoln Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Continental Convertible
Base Price: $6,798
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 320 hp

The Continental received a visual makeover for 1965, concentrating on changes to the front grille, adjoining turn signals and hood. A host of standard luxury, power and convenience features helped set Ford Motor Company’s top brand apart from its siblings. This particular example features a distinctive and uncommon blue convertible top. It also has the rare status of having won every major award offered by the Lincoln Motor Car Foundation – twice! First shown by Larry’s father, it went through the entire show cycle. When ownership passed to Larry, he refreshed the car and repeated the entire cycle as a tribute to his father. The efforts of both men are clearly evident in this flawlessly restored vehicle.

Museum Collection: Gift of Larry S. Pittman – Greencastle, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Vesta Pittman Chambersburg, Pennsylvania


1966_Harley_DavidsonM501966 Harley Davidson Model M50 Sport

Manufacturer: Harley-Davidson Aermacchi Plant, Italy
Model: M50-Sport
Base Price: $225.00 (approximate)
Engine: Single-cylinder, 50 cc

Harley-Davidson is known for its powerful motorcycles, which it has manufactured in America for over a century. However, the company has also produced smaller two-wheeled vehicles, such as mopeds and sport bikes, mainly through its partnerships and mergers with other companies such as Aermacchi (of Italy) and later AMF. The M50, named for its engine displacement, and marketed for a young buying audience. Priced at about $225.00 it was advertised as transportation that could get you where you wanted to go without having to borrow your parent’s wheels. This example was painstakingly restored by its donor using new old stock parts and features several rare options and accessories.

Museum Collection: Gift of Gregory Kissel – Cincinnati, OH


1966-Plymouth-Police-Car-11966 Plymouth Fury II Police Car (Replica)

Manufacturer: Plymouth Div. of Chrysler Corp. – Detroit, Michigan
Model: Fury II
Base Price: $2,579 (passenger Fury II)
Engine: 318 cubic inch Eight-cylinder, 230 hp

Plymouth gave its full size Fury a facelift for 1966. Former owner, Peter Brown, gave this Fury a complete makeover! Beginning with a low mileage, rust free vehicle, Peter built the police car you see before you. Plymouth advertised their base Fury Patroller as an economy police car, designed for duty in congested city traffic. Power plants in police and passenger Furys ranged from a thrifty six-cylinder up to the legendary “Hemi” V8. This vehicle is a highly researched, authentic reproduction, with functional lights and onboard communication systems.

Museum Gift: From Peter & Ellen Brown in memory of Ross Kindestin

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1967 Honda Motorcycle


1967-Cadillac-deVille-Conv1967 Cadillac De Ville Convertible

Manufacturer: General motors Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: DeVille Convertible
Base Price: $5,608
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 340 hp

Pine Crest Green Poly and a White converti-ble top. Whoever owned this back in the day surely gave this car a good nick name, a.k.a “Shoboat”. That is exactly what you would have looked like while cruising down the strip in this land yacht. The 429 cubic inch V8 powered this automobile, and it certainly needed an engine of this size to move it.
The DeVille was the next step up from the Calais, and they shared several features. The only difference between the two models in 1967 were trim variations, and very minor ones at that. Cadillac also had two major innovations in 1967, a slide out fuse box, and the safety locking back rests for the front seats.

Museum Collection: Gift of Arthur Markowitzt –Petersburg, NY

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1965-Lincoln-Continental1967 Lincoln 4DR Convertible

Manufacturer: Lincoln Div., Ford Motor Co. – Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Continental, Four-door Convertible
Base Price: $6,449 (passenger Fury II)
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 340 hp

The 1967 Lincoln was basically a carry-over model from the previous year. Continentals were one of the last American cars to use “suicide” style doors (back doors are hinged at the rear of the door). Air conditioning was not a standard feature on the Continental, although 96.5 percent of buyers opted for this $471.05 option.

Note the “backwards” lettering on the hood script. This “mistake” was done at the factory and left intact by the car’s original owner and also by the Pittman’s when they restored the car.

This Lincoln is one of several cars donated by the Pittman family.

Museum Collection: Gift of Sylvester & Vesta Pittman – Chambersburg, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Vesta Pittman Chambersburg, Pennsylvania


1967 Lincoln 4DR HT (Stainless Steel)

Manufacturer: Lincoln Div., Ford Motor Co. – Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Continental, Four-door Convertible
Base Price: Not Applicable
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 340 hp

In 1935 Allegheny Ludlum Steel Division and the Ford Motor Company collaborated on an experiment to showcase the attributes of stainless steel. Together, they built six stainless steel bodied 1936 Ford Deluxe Sedans. Each of these cars logged at least 200,000 miles and four still exist.

The experiment continued in 1960 with two Thunderbirds and again, for a final time in 1967 with three Lincoln Convertibles. Aside from the body, the Stainless Steel Lincoln retains all the standard 1967 components. Weight for the two cars is about the same. Allegheny retains two of the Lincolns, which are kept for special events and occasionally loaned to museums for public display.

Museum Loan: Courtesy of ATI Allegheny Ludlum – Pittsburgh, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By ATI Allegheny Ludlum Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania


1967-Walter-Snow-Plow1967 Walters Dump Truck w/ Snow Plow

Manufacturer: Walter Truck Company New York, New York
Model: Jumbo ACUS Snow Plow
Engine: Cummins Diesel, 335 hp

William Walter was a Swiss/French immigrant who emigrated to New York City in 1883. He loved to tinker with machines, and became a very innovative man. Knowing that the United States was expanding fast, he decided to go into the truck building business in 1909. His company built various models of trucks for several occasions. Mostly for WWI and WWII in the early years, and then snow plow trucks, and trucks for airport use. These two proved to be the most popular sellers. Walter’s company was later purchased in 1997 by the Kivatch Mobile Equipment Co. This Walter ACUS is equipped with a “Jumbo” 15 ft. V snow plow and also came with extension wings, adding roughly 8 more feet per side.

Museum Collection: Gift of Beverly –McConnellsville, NY

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1967 Honda Super 90

Manufacturer: Honda Tokyo, Japan
Model: Super 90
Base Price:
Engine: Single-cylinder, 8hp

The Honda Super 90 (S90) was introduced to the US market in 1964, and production stopped in 1969. The Honda S90 was called Benly 90 in the European market.

There was only one difference between the two, the S90 had a side stand, while the Benly 90 had a
center stand. Both had non-folding buddy pegs, which allows for another rider, as well as enclosed chain guard, to protect the body and clothing from being caught. The engine is air cooled, 4 stroke, OHC, and a single cylinder. The S90 came in four colors white, black, candy blue and red. This motorcycle has the capability of going 70mph.

Museum Collection: Gift of Patrick I. Booton– Dauphin, Pa.

This Vehicle is Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1968-Buick-Wildcat1968 Buick Wildcat Convertible

Manufacturer: Buick Motor Company Flint, Michigan
Model: Wildcat Custom Convertible
Base Price: $3,896
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 360 hp

The facelift the Buick Wildcat received in 1968, helped it appeal to customers all over the United States. With its standard black vinyl, newly designed front grille, and revised body side moldings, this convertible soon became every man’s dream.

Even though it was a car, it felt like boat to drive. Holding up to 6 people, it needed an enormous engine to move it around, and this is where the Wildcat engine played its roll. The 430 cubic inch engine had a brake horsepower rating of 360, and definitely got the job done. This became the ultimate car for the drive inns. Sure it only sat 6 people legally, but you could fit another 4 in the trunk of this beast.

Museum Collection: Gift of Glenn & Lois Jourdon – Mechanicsburg, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1968 Yamaha 125cc Motorcycle


1968 Chrysler Imperial 4DR HT


1968 Suzuki Model T 500 Motorcycle

Manufacturer: U.S. Suzuki Motor Corp. Santa Fe Springs, California
Model: Model T 500
Base Price:
Engine: 2-stroke, parallel 2-cyclinder, 44hp

This Suzuki is considered one of the most under-rated models ever. First marketed in the USA in 1967, was advertised incorrectly as the first 500cc
2-stroke. At the turn of the 20th century, Alfred Angus, developed the first 500cc 2-stroke motorcycle. Suzuki had the first modern 2-stroke.

Also considered more reliable than most other
4-strokes, the Model T 500 was very fast despite its size. It also had oil-injection direct into the crank-cases, as well as very large and durable roller bearings. The Model T 500, compared to other bikes, needed less maintenance. Production ended in 1977.

Museum Collection: Gift of Joseph R. Lewis– Doylestown, Pa

This Vehicle is Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member of museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1968_Cadillac_Eldorado_Hardtop1968 Cadillac Fleetwood Eldorado

Manufacturer: General Motors Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: Fleetwood Eldorado
Base Price: $6,605
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 375 hp

Even though a United Auto Workers strike at Detroit’s Fisher Body Fleetwood Plant hurt production on the Eldorado in November 1967, sales still hit a record high for the fourth year in a row. Some changes were made from the 1967 model, including a new dashboard design. In addition, recessed windshield wipers required an extra 4.5 inches be added to the length of the hood. This Cadillac is unrestored. It was purchased new by the donor’s uncle. It still has its original paint and California “black plates.”

Museum Collection: Gift of David and Marilyn Chiotti – Santa Rose, CA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1968 Samco (7/8 Cord Replica)


1969_AmericanMotorsCorporation_AMX1969 AMC AMX 2DR Hardtop

Manufacturer: American Motors Corp. Kenosha, WI
Model: AMX
Base Price: $3,297
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 315 hp

American Motors Corporation offered several different “muscle cars” during the late 1960s and early 1970s. The AMX, which is short for American Motors Experimental, was a two-door fastback hardtop available with a variety of powerful V8 engines. The car is essentially a shortened Javelin and shares many common design elements with the larger, four-seater. The “Big Bad” AMX came out in the middle of the year. This option-created model came in three colors and had its bumpers painted the same shade as its body. A total of 284 “Big Bad” Orange AMXs were produced. “Big Bad” Blue and “Big Bad” Green cars were also available. This car was fully restored by its last private owner and won virtually every AMC-club based award prior to its donation.

Museum Collection: Gift of Chris Zinn II – Denver, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Dale & Meg Shaffer York, PA


1969_BuickElectra_225Convertible1969 Buick Electra Convertible

Manufacturer: Buick Motor Company Flint, Michigan
Model: Electra 225 Convertible
Base Price: $4,643
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 360hp

The Electra 225 series was also available in yet a higher standard of class. Like this Electra 225, the “Custom” name was also added. The main appearance factor between the standard Electra and the “Custom” Electra was the interior. On the customs the interior was spiced up a bit, with notchback seats being installed, along with the addition of expanded vinyl. Along with these features, the entire interior was made out of a better quality vinyl, and 2-way power adjustment seats were available on the convertible. This was a one owner car before being donated to the AACA Museum.

The Electra was the largest model offered by Buick in 1969, and with the tapering sweep-spear sculpture line on the Electra it was sure to be a huge success.

Museum Collection: Gift of William Drescher – Syracuse, NY

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1969 Honda S-90


1970-1979

1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS Sport Coupe

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Co. – Detroit, Michigan
Model: Chevelle SS Sport Coupe
Base Price: $2,572
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 450 hp

The “Big Block” 454 cubic inch Chevelle is considered by many automotive enthusiasts as one of the top performers of the muscle car era. This particular example is a true factory equipped LS6 model boasting Chevrolet’s top V8 engine rated at 450 horsepower. This engine, which makes the car so rare and valuable today, was a $263.30 option in 1970 – one that very few new owners selected.

This unrestored example is exhibited “as found.” It is part of the historic 21-trailer muscle car find that was discovered in Wisconsin in 2006. Additional information on the collection is available on the graphic panels surrounding the car.

Museum Collection: Gift of Scott Milestone – Bethesda, MD

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1970 Honda CT70 Mini-Trail


1970 Ford Maverick

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, Michigan
Model: Maverick
Base Price: $1,995
Engine: Six-cylinder, 105 hp

Ford introduced the Maverick in 1969 as a midyear model. It was built on the existing compact Falcon chassis and powered by a 170 cubic inch six-cylinder engine. For 1969 and 1970 only a two-door sedan was available; a four-door, optional V8 engine and special “Grabber” package would follow in subsequent years.

This example was purchased new by the donor’s (Margaret’s) parents through Alfred P. Liebold Ford in Huntington Valley, PA. They kept the car through 2004 when it was acquired by the Bogners who gave it to the Museum in 2010. The car has received one repaint but it otherwise unrestored with only 42,000 miles.

Museum Collection: Gift of Robert & Margaret Bogner – Willow Grove, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1970 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible


1974 Bricklin SV-1 Gullwing Coupe


1974 BMW R75/6 Motorcycle

Manufacturer: Bayerische Motorenwerke AG Munich, Germany
Model: R75/6
Engine: Two-Cylinder ‘boxer’, 745cc 50hp

Bayerische Motoren Werke, better known as BMW, became incorporated in 1913, and produced aircraft engines during its early days. After WWI, Germany was forbidden to manufacture airplanes, causing BMW to start producing motorcycles. By 1921 it created its first bike, the R32, in 1923. Its first 750cc debuted in 1928 with a top speed of 71mph. The 1st Series R75 was born in 1941, and subsequent series were created with the /6 introduced in 1973. In 1974 BMWs became equipped with a 5-speed transmission and disc brakes.

The donor purchased this bike as a basket-case, restored it over many years, and donated it once reassembled. BMW bikes are known as ‘Beemers’ while the cars are “Bimmers”!

Museum Donation: Courtesy of Thomas Miller– Boalsburg, PA

This Vehicle is Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1974 Bricklin SV-1

Manufacturer: Bricklin St. John, New Brunswick Canada
Model: SV-1
Base Price: $5,000 (approximate)
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 220 hp

The Bricklin was the brainchild of millionaire Malcolm Bricklin, best known for founding Subaru of America. The gull-wing doored sports car was built of fiberglass in a Canadian plant. Bricklin intended the car to be both sporty and safe (SV-1 = Safety Vehicle One), incorporating impact bumpers, side beams and an integrated roll cage. Power came from either Ford 351 cid or AMC 360 cid V8s as featured in this restored example. Much like the later DeLorean, the Bricklin was plagued by financial problems, and build quality issues, which resulted in poor sales. The company lost thousands of dollars on every vehicle it sold. A total of 2,854 cars were built (1974, 75 and 76 models) before the company went into receivership.

Museum Collection: Joseph “Zeke” Disciullo – Coatesville, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.

1974 Harley Davidson AMF A90 Motorcycle

Manufacturer: Aermacchi (for AMF/ Harley-Davidson USA) Italy
Model: Z90 (Aermacchi)
Engine: 90 cc

When 21-year old William S. Harley and his 20-year old friend Arthur Davidson made available to the public the first Harley-Davidson motorcycle in 1903, they could not possibly know the impact their company would have on transportation in the 20th century. Today the term “Harley” is synonymous with “American Motorcycle.” In 1969, the company was purchased by American Machinery and Foundry (AMF) who changed the brand image with smaller bikes such as this Z90, advertised in promotional literature as the “Great American Freedom Machine.” This example is all original with only 665 miles. AMF sold Harley to an investment group in 1981 who revitalized the company’s image and emphasized the brand’s “retro” appeal.

Museum Collection: Gift of Wayne Vanemon – Williamsport, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1975 AMC Pacer

Manufacturer: American Motors Corp. Kenosha, WI
Model: Pacer X
Base Price:
Engine: Six-Cylinder, 95 hp

When AMC introduced the Pacer in 1975 it was unlike any other vehicle on the road. It featured a unique hatchback design, a passenger’s side door that was larger than the driver’s door, a high glass area, a sloping hood and rack and pinion steering. It was AMC’s first all new design in many years. The Pacer sold nearly 100,000 units in its first year but the success did not last. Although much maligned, the Pacer enjoys a dedicated cult following in the automotive world. This sporty “X” model was won by the donor through a promotional contest in 1975. She also received a complete kit of Pacer related materials as part of her prize.

Museum Collection: Gift of Michaline Dietz – Severna Park, MD

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1975 Chevrolet Caprice Classic Convertible

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: Caprice Classic Convertible
Base Price: $5,113
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 150 hp

The Caprice was introduced in 1965 as a luxury trim package for its full-size Impala sedan. The model was produced through 1996. Initial sales success led Chevrolet to expand the Caprice lineup to include hardtops, station wagons and eventually convertibles.

This unrestored car has approximately 16,000 miles. It was purchased new by the Pittman family. The donor’s son, Larry, elected to donate the convertible rather than accept it as a gift. It is the fifth vehicle given to the Museum by the Pittman family. This car is a true example of one family’s commitment to the AACA and the Museum it created.

Museum Collection: Gift of Vesta Pittman – Chambersburg, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Vesta Pittman Chambersburg, Pennsylvania


1975 Pontiac Grand Ville 4DR Convertible Sedan

Manufacturer: Pontiac Motor Division Detroit, Michigan
Model: Grandville Brougham Convertible
Base Price: $5,858
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 185 hp

The Pontiac car got its start in 1926 as a model or companion car for General Motors’s Oakland brand. It set a sales record for a debuting model and went on to become the only GM sibling to devour its parent, as the Oakland nameplate was dropped after 1931.

Pontiac continued to sell well throughout much of the 20th century, establishing itself as a slightly upscale and sporty division in GM’s corporate hierarchy. In addition to performance vehicles such as the GTO and Firebird, they also built quality family lines such as the Grandville Series, offered as two-door hardtop, convertible and four-door sedan. Pontiac ended production in 2009.

Museum Collection: Gift of Douglas Bennett – Raleigh, NC

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1975 Pontiac Grandville 4DR HT Sedan

Manufacturer: Pontiac Motor Division Detroit, Michigan
Model: Grandville Brougham
Base Price: $5,896
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 185 hp

The Pontiac car got its start in 1926 as a model or companion car for General Motors’s Oakland brand. It set a sales record for a debuting model and went on to become the only GM sibling to devour its parent, as the Oakland nameplate was dropped after 1931.

Pontiac continued to sell well throughout much of the 20th century, establishing itself as a slightly upscale and sporty division in GM’s corporate hierarchy. In addition to performance vehicles such as the GTO and Firebird, they also built quality family sedans such as the Grandville Series, also offered as two-door hardtop and convertible. Pontiac ended production in 2009.

Museum Collection: Gift of Thomas Beckley – Harrisburg, PA

This Vehicle Adopted By Cowen & Dorothy T. Beckley

1976 Honda Goldwing w/side car

Manufacturer: Honda
Model: GL-1000 Gold Wing with Vetter side car
Engine: 1,000cc 4-cylinder ‘boxer’ 82hp

Honda’s “Gold Wing” debuted in 1974 at the Cologne Motorcycle Show in October 1974, setting the mega-tourer trend for years to come, although in reality it was never planned that way. Honda initially did not offer a touring package, but the aftermarket suppliers stepped up and gave customers what they wanted, giving the bike its place in the motorcycle world. Honda eventually listened, and the Gold Wing became a legend. This bike is a perfect example of how a tourer could be fitted, with both a Vetter’s fairing and sidecar to match.

Museum Collection: Gift of Andrew Rehbogen Jr.– Harrisburg, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1977 Cadillac Seville 4DR Sedan

Manufacturer: Cadillac Division, General Motors Corp. – Detroit, MI
Model: Seville Four-Door Sedan
Base Price: $13,359
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 180 hp

The Seville was a radical departure for Cadillac. It was smaller and more fuel-efficient than its predecessors and many of its contemporaries. This particular example was originally a gift to actress Betty White (The Golden Girls, Mama’s Family, Mary Tyler Moore Show, etc.) from her husband, TV game show host, Allen Ludden. It was ordered in the custom color, sea-mist green, and features a floor-mounted AT&T mobile phone. The car appeared on a two-part episode of Mama’s Family. Affectionately named “Parakeet,” Mrs. White donated the car to the Humane Society for a 2002 charity auction. It spent several years as a collector car before its 2009 donation to the Museum.

Museum Collection: Gift of Nicholas Ferrantino – Houston, TX

This Vehicle Adopted By Potomac Region Cadillac & LaSalle Club
www.clcpotomacregion.org


1977 Chrysler Cordoba

Manufacturer: Chrysler Corporation Detroit, Michigan
Model: Cordoba
Base Price: $5,368
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 190 hp

The Cordoba debuted in 1975 as a luxury twin of Chrysler’s muscular Charger model. The car offered buyers a luxury name and luxury feel at a “normal” car price. This Cordoba is powered by an optional 400 cubic inch V8 engine with a 4-barrel carburetor. It also sports the rare T-top option. Inside is an interior of “Fine Corinthian Leather” made famous by actor, Ricardo Montalban, in his TV Hall of Fame commercials. Chrysler sold 183,146 Cordobas in 1977. The model remained in production through 1983.

Museum Collection: Gift of Roland Muchicko –Butler, Pa

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1977 Cadillac Seville 4D Sedan

Manufacturer: Cadillac Division, General Motors Corp. – Detroit, MI
Model: Seville Four-Door Sedan
Base Price: $13,359
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 180 hp

The Seville was a radical departure for Cadillac. It was smaller and more fuel-efficient than its predecessors and many of its contemporaries. This particular example was originally a gift to actress Betty White (The Golden Girls, Mama’s Family, Mary Tyler Moore Show, etc.) from her husband, TV game show host, Allen Ludden. It was ordered in the custom color, sea-mist green, and features a floor-mounted AT&T mobile phone. The car appeared on a two-part episode of Mama’s Family. Affectionately named “Parakeet,” Mrs. White donated the car to the Humane Society for a 2002 charity auction. It spent several years as a collector car before its 2009 donation to the Museum.

Museum Collection: Gift of Nicholas Ferrantino – Houston, TX

This Vehicle Adopted By Potomac Region Cadillac & LaSalle Club
www.clcpotomacregion.org

1977 Puch Moped

Manufacturer: Steyr-Daimler-Puch Graz, Austria
Model: Maxi Sport
Engine: 48.8 cc, 1.5 hp

The Puch Company originally got its start by producing bicycles when it was founded in 1889, but eventually transitioned into building motorcycles and mopeds in 1903, and even some automobiles. The company later merged with Steyr and Daimler creating Steyr-Daimler-Puch. Being most widely recognized for their mopeds, sales in the United States exploded, due to their mobility, durability, and that they were very economical. They soon became the most common brand in the United States.

This Maxi Sport Puch had roughly 1.5 horsepow-er and could go as fast as 28 mph. The company was in existence from 1889 until 1987 when it was sold to Piaggio

Museum Collection: Gift of John Moore – Gettysburg, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1978 Honda CB400A Motorcycle

Manufacturer: Honda Motors Company Tokyo, Japan
Model: CB400A Hawk “Hondamatic”
Engine: 395cc, 26.8hp

One wonders why no manufacturer thought of this before: Why not offer a motorcycle offered with an automatic transmission? Honda answered this question from 1976-78 with the 750A, with minimal success. In 1978 they debuted the CB400A featured here. It offered modest performance (albeit slower) with its two-speed semi-automatic transmission, proving popular with the general public. Of note is a parking brake replacing a clutch lever on conventional bikes. Today, these are very rare motorcycles.

This bike, nicknamed “Clara” in honor of its first owner Clara Singley, was purchased as a birthday gift for the donor by her husband as Mrs. Miller said she would learn to ride if she had an automatic motorcycle. To make it usable for Clara while touring, the bike was heavily modified with aftermarket parts including a lowered seat, side bags, crash bars, and a windshield with fairing.

Museum Collection: Gift of Rhonda R. Miller– Boalsburg, Pa

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1978_Firebird_Espirt_Skybird1978 Pontiac Firebird Espirit 2DR Sports Cp

Manufacturer: Pontiac Motor Division Detroit, MI
Model: Firebird Esprit
Base Price: $4,992
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 170 hp

Appearance remained similar to the 1977 Firebird, but the Esprit added several features. It added; wheel covers, sport mirrors, custom pedal trim, and chrome wheel well moldings. This designed then changed in 1979, with the redesign of the front end.

This car was restored in 2010-2011 by students from the Collision Repair Technology curriculum at PA College of Technology in Williamsport, PA with funding from the Susquehannock Region of the AACA. They disassembled the car, made any and all body repairs, repainted it the original color of Lombard Blue, and then reassembled the car.

Museum Collection: Gift of Patricia Lovaas –Springfield, VA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1979_Kawaski_Motorcycle1979 Kawasaki KZ1000 Motorcycle

Manufacturer: Kawasaki Japan
Model: KZ1000 LTD
Engine: Four-cylinder, 90 hp

The KZ1000 was introduced in September 1977 and a 1978 model and replacement for the KZ900. It had a four-cylinder engine, producing about 90 horsepower and a 5-speed transmission. This version has the multiple carburetor setup and produced even more power. Upon its release, the KZ1000 was among the world’s fastest production motorcycles. It weighed 525 pounds, could cover the quarter mile in about 12 seconds and had a top speed near 140 miles per hour. This model was used extensively by police departments and starred in the TV series CHIPS – California Highway Patrol – and the Mel Gibson movie, Mad Max. This example was given to the Museum by the Brandt family in memory of its owner, Michael D. Brandt.

Museum Collection: Gift of David J. Brandt – Palmyra, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1979-Rolls-Royce-Silver-Shadow1979 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow II

Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd. Crewe, Cheshire, England
Model: Silver Shadow II
Base Price: $65,400
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 220 hp

In 1979 very few revisions were made to the second generation Silver Shadow II. The main difference in appearance were the air intake grills next to the radiator shell. In it’s 12 year history the Silver Shadow II had undergone in 2,000 changes or modifications. Only 8, 425 of the Silver Shadow’s were produced from 1977– 1980 and all were equipped with the 412 cubic inch V8.

Rolls-Royce History Note: In 1980 Rolls-Royce merged with Vickers Ltd.

Museum Collection: Gift of Peter Olaynack—New York, NY

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1980-1989

1980_Rolls_Royce_Corniche1980 Rolls-Royce Corniche Convertible

Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce Motors, Ltd. – Cheshire, England
Model: Corniche Convertible
Base Price: $109,800
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 220 hp

The Corniche debuted in 1971 as a replace-ment for the two-door Silver Shadow. It was available as a coupe and a convertible. Alt-hough it weighed 4,700 pounds, the Corniche was capable of reaching 60 miles per hour in under 10 seconds and had a top speed of 120 miles per hour. This performance made it pop-ular among American buyers.

Unique features included a low-loss exhaust system, tuned engine and custom bodies by H. J. Mulliner-Park Ward, which took up to five months to construct. The Corniche went through five design changes before production ended in 2002.

Museum Gift: From Benjamin and Judith Marks, Boca Raton, FL

This Vehicle Adopted By Benjamin Marks, Boca Raton, Florida


1980_Cadillac

1980 Cadillac 2DR Sedan


1981 Lancia Beta-Zagato


1982 GMC “Jimmy” Sports Utility Vehicle


1982 Suzuki GS 850GL Motorcycle

Manufacturer: Suzuki Motor Corporation Japan
Model: GS-850 GL
Base Price: $3,199
Engine: Four-Stroke Transverse Vertical Four

The Suzuki Motorcycle was one of the early Japanese entrants into the U.S. Mar-ket after Honda. Suzuki was known for performance and style. The 1982 GS-850 GL was equipped with a 4-stroke DOHC Engine with Suzuki shaft drive. The suspension featured front air forks and adjustable damping rear shocks. All these features provided exceptional comfort, power and handling for the GS-850G.

Museum Collection: Donated by Joseph R. Lewis– Doylestown, Pa

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1982 Suzuki GS850GL Motorcycle

Manufacturer: U.S. Suzuki Motor Corp. Santa Fe Springs, California
Model: GS 850 L
Base Price: $3,199
Engine: 4-Cylinders, 4 Stroke, Inline

Michio Suzuki (1887-1982) opened Suzuki Loom Works in 1909. By the 1930’s Suzuki wanted to expand his loom making company, and started to build compact cars. 1954, Suzuki changed the company name to Suzuki Motor Co., Ltd.

The GS Series are motorcycles featuring air-cooled parallel-twin and Inline four engines with 2-4 valves per cylinder.

The 1982 GS 850 L is considered to be a well balanced bike. The Shaft Drive, Soft Suspension Fore, Aft Works, and the padded seats all help to limit the vibrations and bumps one might fell while driving this bike. The brakes were improved for smoother brake action, and the alternator capacity increased to 230 watts. This bike is capable of doing the quarter mile in 12.67 seconds at 106.7 mph.

Museum Collection: Gift of Joseph R. Lewis– Doylestown, Pa

This Vehicle is Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member of museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1984 Cadillac Sedan DeVille


1984_Chrysler_LeBaron_TurboConvertible1984 Chrysler LeBaron Turbo Convertible

Manufacturer: Chrysler Corporation Auburn Hills, Michigan
Model: Chrysler LeBaron Turbo
Base Price: $11,595
Engine: Four-cylinder, 140 hp

Remaining practically unchanged from the previous year, this 1984 LeBaron Turbo did have some slight changes. It was equipped with the standard 135 cubic inch 4-cylinder as all the other models that year, but with the addition of the turbo is had an extra 41 horsepower. Some other changes included the switch from a plastic to glass rear window in the convertible top, and a revised rear end with wraparound tail lights.

This car is 1 of 16,208 Turbo’s built in 1984, and remains completely original with the exception of the American racing wheels.

Museum Gift: From James Cicmon, Pottstown, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
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1985-Chevrolet-Corvette1985 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: Corvette Coupe
Base Price: $24,873
Engine: Eight-Cylinder, 230 hp

Chevrolet’s iconic Corvette received a total re-design for 1984 along with a new assembly plant in Bowling Green, Kentucky. The C4 (fourth generation) ‘Vette was termed “the most advanced production car on the planet” by Motor Trend magazine. Extensive use of stainless steel and aluminum throughout its sport suspension and the use of multi-port fuel injection were a few of its cutting edge features. Top speed was 150 mph.
This example in Bright Red with matching red leather interior was purchased by its donor when it was approximately two years old. He has meticulously maintained the car in its original condition. It has travelled a mere 32,000, miles and retains the majority of its original parts, tags and factory markings.

Museum Collection: Gift of Gregory Kissel– Cincinnati, OH

This Vehicle is Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member of museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1985_Buick_Century_Sedan

1985 Buick 4DR Century Limited Sedan


1985_RollsRoyceSilverSpur1985 Rolls-Royce Silver Spur II 4DR Sedan

Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd. Crewe, England
Model: Silver Spur
Base Price: $119,000
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 220 hp

The Silver Spur was becoming a hit for Rolls-Royce enthusiasts. With a normal 412 cubic inch Rolls engine, that produced the yet again normal 220 horsepower. There is no exact number of how many were sold in the United States, but Rolls-Royce did for the first time in 18 years sell a limo to the US. This limo was based off the Spirit chassis, and the Spur’s cosmetic design.
Later in 1995, 5o lucky people had the chance to purchase a turbocharged Rolls-Royce called the Flying Spur. The cost was $225,000.

Museum Collection: Gift of Morris Antar –Penn Valley, PA

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1985 Ford Escort 2DR Hatchback

Manufacturer: Ford Motor Company Dearborn, MI
Model: Escort hatchback
Base Price: $5,518 (1982)
Engine: 1.6 liter Four-cylinder, 68hp

Henry Ford was no stranger to making cars for the masses, as evidenced by the Model T of 1909-27. When the Ford Escort debuted in 1981, it was dubbed “The World Car” in reference to its international presence. Throughout the years, the peppy Escort was offered in a variety of body styles and engine choices until the name was phased out in 2000. This car is an example of the 1st generation Escorts, built from 1981-1990.

The donor purchased this particular car new, lovingly drove it for over 170,000 miles, and has painstakingly maintained and restored the car, even taking it to car shows where it has always garnered attention!

Museum Collection: Gift of Phyllis V. Buff– Waldorf, MD

This Vehicle Adopted by Phyllis & Ted Buff, Waldorf, MD


1986 Rolls-Royce Silver Spur Limousine

Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce Motors Ltd. Crewe, England
Model: Silver Spur Limousine
Base Price: $198,000
Engine: 6,750cc V8

In 1980, Rolls-Royce introduced two new cars to their line-up: the Silver Spirit and the long-wheelbase version Silver Spur. Although the bodies were completely new, the chassis was essentially identical to the previous Silver Shadow but with a new self-leveling suspension. The factory offered even longer limousine versions of the Silver Spur such as the car you see here.
This particular car was originally owned by the late singer Whitney Houston, often referred to as “the Rolls-Royce of soul voices“. Ms. Houston purchased the car through her music publishing company Nippy Inc. and used it extensively for her daily activities. Among the car’s features is a division window, TV/VCR, and a wet bar with crystal glasses.

Museum Collection: Gift of Anonymous Donor

This Vehicle Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


1989-Cadillac-Saville

1989 Cadillac Seville STS Touring Sedan


1989-Chevrolet-IROC-Camaro_Conv1989 Chevrolet Camaro IROC Z28

Manufacturer: Chevrolet Motor Company Detroit, Michigan
Model: Camaro IROC-Z Convertible
Base Price: $14,145
Engine: Eight-cylinder, 220 hp

The Camaro IROC-Z came in two different styles, the Coupe and the Convertible. The Convertible is extremely rare. With the introduction of the IROC-Z, the Camaro RS was now the lowest priced Camaro one could find. The RS model was influenced by the IROC-Z model.

Some key features on this IROC-Z Convertible include tinted windows, air conditioning, a 305 cubic inch V8, and numerous other power equipment options. Since the Camaro was ranked as the most likely to be stolen the previous year, Chevrolet decided to add an anti-theft unit on the car. They called their system the PASS (Personal Automotive Security System) Key Theft-Deterrent System.

Museum Collection: Gift of Douglas W. Bennett – Raleigh, NC

This Vehicle Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.

1990-1999

1997_Lincoln_TownCar

1997 Lincoln Signature Series Town Car

2000

2000 Suzuki Hyabusa Motorcycle

Manufacturer: Suzuki Japan
Model: Hyabusa GSX
Base Price: $10,499
Engine: 175 hp, inline 4, 4 stroke

Suzuki introduced the Hyabusa in 1999, and it was the first motorcycle to beat the speed record by a very large margin. There have been speeds recorded of over 200 mph. It had the most powerful engine of 1999.

The Hyabusa stayed the same until 2007, with the exception of a speed limitation. In 2001, Europe and Japan made an informal agreement to put a speed limit on motorcycles. The top speed was now 186 mph.

In 2008 there were minor styling and fine tuning of the engines head, pistons and exhaust. Engine changes were limited. In 2010, there were more col-or options.

Museum Collection: Gift of Dr. Roland M. Brown Jr.—Morristown, NJ

This Vehicle is Available for Adoption YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member of museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.


2002 BMW Mini-Cooper (modified into a snow mobile)

Manufacturer: BMW Group Oxford, United Kingdom
Model: MINI Cooper modified
Engines: Front: 1.6 Liter MINI four-cylinder
Rear: (2) Polaris Vertical Escape 800ccTwin-cylinder two-stroke engines Approximately 400 hp total

This MINI Cooper snowmobile was designed and created in 2003 as part of the Discovery Channel’s “Monster Garage” TV program. Hosted by custom motorcycle fabricator and owner of West Coast Choppers Jesse James, the show featured James and his assembly team from Polaris modified an every-day production MINI Cooper hardtop into a “monster machine” under strict rules that placed restrictions on time, budget and parts. The entire guts were removed from the car and two (2!)
complete Polaris 800cc snowmobile assemblies were installed, each with 151×2” race tracks.

After completion, it was trucked to Richard Petty’s ranch in Wyoming for filming, where Petty raced against the MINI with a new 2004 Polaris Pro X 700 sled. Petty was victorious. The TV episode was initially aired February 24, 2003.

Museum Collection: Gift of MINI USA /BMW NA

This Vehicle is Available for Adoption: YOUR NAME COULD BE HERE!
Please see a staff member or museum volunteer for Adopt A Car Program information.

We typically exhibit 75 to 100 cars at any one time. The vehicle collection is subject to change. The Museum built its collection solely through donations. Not every vehicle is on display; some are not in exhibitable condition. Check our current exhibitions to see what’s on display now, or browse the upcoming exhibits to see what’s around the corner.