717-566-7100

Back to the Future Tribute Car

The Future is Now at the AACA Museum On display from June 20 – October 30 Will be offsite for an event and not available for view on 9/12 & 13 The AACA Museum is turning back the hands of time this summer. Along with our A Family Affair:  Station Wagons exhibit, we thought it would fun to honor the 30th Anniversary of the “Back to the Future” movies.  The year 2015 was the year they traveled to in the original “Back to the Future” movie at the end of Part 1 and again in Part 2.   We will feature a “Back to the Future” tribute car – an original DeLorean that has been hand crafted to look like the original movie car.   There are also concept prints on display to show the progression of this tribute car to the finished product. In the 1985 blockbuster film Back to the Future, the story revolved around a time machine that Doc Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd) built out of a Delorean automobile.  Teenager Marty McFly (played by Michael J. Fox) accidentally got sent back to the 1950s and caused all sorts of havoc including accidentally preventing his parents first meeting.  Having to unite his parents and get “back to the future”, the film’s comedy, adventure and science fiction reached a cord with the film going public The film spawned two sequels, a Saturday morning cartoon show, 3 theme park rides, and numerous commercial tie ins.   The DeLorean vehicle itself became a character of the film series.  At the end of the first movie the car became a flying car in the then future year of “2015”.  In the second movie released in 1989 the car flew around with many other flying cars in 2015.  In the third and final installment of the film trilogy the car was modified with 1950s white wall tires and a “time circuit” hood box.  In 1885 the DeLorean no longer ran as there was no gasoline, so the time machine was modified with train wheels and pushed with a  steam locomotive. This tribute car was built out of an original 1982 DeLorean street vehicle (the ones used in the movie were the 1981 model which had a few minor cosmetic differences).  After an auto accident in 2007, the car was repaired and then converted into a replica of the time machine as seen in the film series.  Everything was done by hand to replicate the props as seen in the movie.  Some items on the car are resin castings off of original props used on the film series cars.  Many items are the same surplus items the film makers used to put the car together.   The conversion process took about 4 years to complete. In addition to the tribute car, the display will include several original pieces of time machines used on screen, production photos used by Industrial...

Read More

1932 Reo Royale 8-35 Rumbleseat

1932 Reo Royale 8-35 Rumbleseat Coupe, Murray To be on display in the Museum June 5 – October 8 Reo built its first automobiles in 1904, followed by trucks in 1908. The Lansing, Michigan company was founded by Ransom Eli Olds, the father of the Oldsmobile, after he left his namesake company which became part of General Motors. Starting in 1931, Reo introduced the luxurious Royale with coachwork designed by Amos Northrup, chief body designer for Murray. The pioneering streamlined bodies were powered by a 358cid, 125hp straight eight on either a 131” or a 135” wheelbase featuring one-shot chassis lubrication and thermostatically-controlled radiator shutters. At $2445.00, this was Reo’s most expensive car. By 1933 the company was in deep financial trouble and following stockholder squabbles, Olds gave up control of the company in late-1934; car production was discontinued in summer 1936 while Reo concentrated exclusively in the commercial vehicle filed. This is one of 3,908 Reos produced for 1932, including 176 8-35 Royales. It is one of just 32 Rumbleseat Coupes built for the model year and the only known survivor. This vehicle participated in The Elegance at Hershey 2015 event....

Read More

A Family Affair: Station Wagons

May 23 – October 12, 2015 Who is up for a summer Roadtrip! Remember the Wagon Queen Family Truckster from National Lampoon’s Vacation? How about Carol Brady’s Plymouth Satellite wagon from The Brady Bunch? Do you have fond memories as a kid of riding in the back of the Vista Cruiser with a picnic cooler on the way to a family outing? If you do, you’re not alone. We at the AACA Museum do, and are celebrating those days before minivans, SUVs and soccer moms, before GPS units replaced paper road maps and in-car entertainment systems replaced ‘spot the license plate’ games and such. Call them station wagons, suburbans, depot hacks, or shooting breaks, the origin of these utility vehicles became prevalent in the teens and twenties, but became very popular in the Post War periods of the 1950s and 60s. As America developed into a two-car family, the station wagon became the workhorse, taking the kids to school and summer camp, hauling the dog to the vets and transporting groceries. “A Family Affair” will showcase both familiar and lesser known examples of station wagons and the impact they had on family life. We would like to thank our supporting sponsor b magazine. Be sure to watch for their article on this exhibit in the summer issue! Here’s a list of the vehicles on the floor: 1948 Bentley Mark VI Radford Countryman 1952 Nash Rambler 1953 Mercury Monterey 1955 Powell Sport wagon 1958 Edsel Villager 1959 Ford Country Sedan wagon 1961 Willys Wagon 1962 Corvair Monza 900 1962 Stageway Chevrolet, Milton Hershey School vehicle 1962 Chevrolet Bel Air 1963 Chevrolet Impala 1964 Dodge Custom 880 1968 Mercury Commuter wagon 1970 VW Squareback 1971 AMC Hornet Sportabout 1972 Volvo P1800ES 1974 Chevrolet Vega Kammback 1979 Volvo 265 1980 Ford Pinto Rallye wagon 1981 Renault 18i 1984 Dodge Caravan 1986 Jeep Grand Wagoner 1987 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham Wagon   The AACA Museum received a recent donation of a 1962 Stageway Chevrolet Station Wagon Coach formally a Milton Hershey School vehicle used to transport students in the 1960s and 1970s.    We’re excited to share this piece of local history as part of this exhibit. Learn more on this vehicle>> Donate to this Restoration Project>> Link to recent Hemmings articles on this project: http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2015/03/19/stretched-chevrolet-station-wagon-from-the-milton-hershey-school-joins-the-aaca-museum-collection/?refer=news Argument for preserving an old car – Hemmings: http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2015/03/20/the-simple-argument-for-preserving-any-old-car/?refer=news Remembering the Wagons courtesy of Milton Hershey School The 20th Annual AACA Museum CARnival Car Show will take place on Saturday, June 20th!   We’re excited to have a featured area for Station Wagons right out front during this event.   Be sure to join us for a fun day! Learn More About this Event> Register your Vehicle to...

Read More

Automotive Jewelry Art Exhibit by Michael Furman

May 23 – September 19, 2015 Since Michael Furman photographed his first car in the studio, he became fascinated by the mascots and badges that have identified them. They appear as small sculptures or designs in themselves, and became the subject of Michael’s recent book, Automotive Jewelry, Volume One; Mascots, Badges. A book like this had not been undertaken before – a visual reference of the great automotive “identifiers” since the late 1800s – unencumbered by the distractions of color, reflections and shapes that normally limit their presentation. Mascots and badges vary and mature over the years, reflective of design trends, safety regulations and material availability. The importance of the mascots – how they began as early branding forms and then became integrated into the overall design and presence of the car. Images from the Automotive Jewelry, Volume One; Mascots, Badges book is the subject of this unique art exhibit. Several Mascots from the AACA Museum’s collection will be part of this exhibit. More about artist Michael Furman: As a young boy, Michael Furman first picked up a camera to photograph a 1963 Corvette Split Window Coupe. And thus began a life-long love affair with cars and cameras. Michael studied photography at the prestigious Rochester Institute of Technology, earning a Fine Arts degree in 1974. Upon graduation, he opened his studio in his native Philadelphia, and built a successful business shooting still life assignments for major advertising and corporate clients. But it was a long-standing love of cars that led him to the challenge of shooting cars in the studio. While shooting new cars for the major manufacturers, Michael was asked to shoot a number of vintage automobiles and motorcycles. He instantly became enamored with these elegant forms; this new path leading to his position as the most sought-after photographer of significant automobiles in the world. Visit Michael Furman’s website for more:...

Read More

Motorbikes for the Masses

Motorbikes for the Masses Guest Curator Rob Kain tells us more about this summer exhibit Inexpensive, reliable, easy to maneuver and park transportation for a crowded urban area. This is where motorbikes, scooters, and mopeds really shine compared to ‘traditional’ motorcycles. The AACA Museum honors these often under-appreciated and sometimes ridiculed machines with its new exhibit, “Motorbikes for the Masses”. While not a new invention (the 1915 Motoped from Long Island is considered to be the first production scooter), smaller motorbikes and scooters gained immense popularity during Post-WWII Europe and Asia. The ravages of war had left many factories in ruins, and transportation requirements for the populace were in dire need. Former aircraft factories, forbidden to build planes, turned to these two-wheeled, small-framed machines. They were easy to manufacture compared to automobiles or other large forms of transportation, provided much -needed jobs and immediate freedom to travel for the public. While the most iconic machines came from Germany, Japan and Italy, motorbikes have been produced and sold throughout the world. Here in America, major suppliers including Sears & Roebuck, Montgomery Wards and even Harley-Davidson offered imported examples under their brand name. While not as successful in sales numbers compared to Europe and Asia, these little entry-level ‘cycles have achieved a cult-level status amongst their admirers. “Motorbikes for the Masses” captures that appeal and its forgotten but historical styles and designs within its exhibit.  Exhibit Vehicle Listing & Partner Sponsors 1948 Whizzer Pacemaker 1955 Lambretta Model 150FD Three- wheeler Owner Jason McQuown 1955 Rixe Export Deluxe moped Owner Andrew Baker 1956 Allstate Cushman model 62 scooter Owner Dave Miller 1956 Miele Deluxe moped Owner Ed Hanula 1957 TWIN Contessa scooter Owner Roland Henry 1959 Allstate Scooter 1959 Cazenave moped Owner Andrew Baker 1959 Zundapp Bella R154 scooter Owner Roland Henry 1959 Simson KR50 scooter Owner Dave Miller 1960 Harley-Davidson Topper 1960 IWL Berlin SR59 Scooter Owner Roland Henry 1960 Peugeot Model BB104 Moped Owner Rob Kain 1960 Riverside AV76 moped Owner Rob Kain Thank You to this Vehicle’s Partner Sponsor: ROB KAIN 1961 Mitsubishi Silver Pigeon 1962 Motokov Cezeta 502 scooter & trailer Owner Roland Henry Thank You to this Vehicle’s Partner Sponsor: TMI SCOOTER CLUB   1964 Allstate Puch MS-50 moped Owner Rob Kain 1964 Heinkel Tourist scooter Owner Svend Sheppard Thank You to this Vehicle’s Partner Sponsor: Carlisle Cycle & Scooter Courtesy of: SVEND SHEPPARD, III   1965 Lambretta J100 ‘Cento’ scooter Owner Rob Kain 1966 Harley Davidson Aermacci 1966 Honda P50 moped Owner Dave Miller 1969 Lambretta Luna Cometa Owner Jason McQuown 1970 Jawa model 21 scooter Owner Dave Miller 1970 Honda Trail 70 minibike Owner Matt Gotwalt 1977 Vespa Rally 200 Owner Jason McQuown 1978 Puch Newport moped 1979 Honda Dax minibike Owner Matt Gotwalt 1980 Puch Maxi-Luxe moped Owner Doug Jackson 2002 Cyklon-Berstal Solex S3800 Owner Roland Henry   Motorbikes for the Masses vehicle List – Updated 3/18/15...

Read More

Tucker Automobiles: The Cammack Collection

“A man who has once gotten automobiles into his blood can never give them up. . .” Preston Tucker American History Illustrated Now Open! The AACA Museum has completed phase 1 on a most meaningful phase of its development – the renovation of the existing 5,200 square foot Cammack Gallery creating an unparalleled exhibit: the world’s largest and best-known collection of Tucker 48 automobiles, engines, mechanicals and automobilia from Tucker historian and collector David Cammack. This permanent, interactive and educational exhibit involves vistors in the compelling story of the development of these historic vehicles and dynamically displays their unique and advanced features. Beyond the cars, we’ve chronicled Preston Tucker’s vision, determination and struggles that are so much a part of the marque’s history. The Tucker exhibit is a “must see” attraction for hobbyists, historians and the general public from all over the world. The Cammack Tucker Gallery design has been fully endorsed by descendants of Preston Tucker, acting as historic advisors during the build process. “The effort being put forth by the AACA team in the presentation of the Cammack Tucker collection is not only an honor to the Tucker family but also the man who had an amazing passion to preserve the history of the Tucker story” exclaimed Sean Tucker, Preston’s great-grandson. To continue to develop Phase 2 we need your help and financial support. Please consider a generous tax-deductible donation to this world-class exhibit. Enjoy a video of the gallery courtesy of Vimeo   Tucker ’48 Models – The perfect Souvenir! A metal 1:43 scale model of the famous Tucker ’48! Exclusive to the AACA Museum, this one-of-a-kind model was produced by Brooklin Models Limited. Available in three colors that match to match the Cammack Tucker collection automobiles here at the AACA Museum – #1001 Tucker Maroon,#1022 Tucker Grey (Silver) and #1026 bronze. Models will be available in our retail store and via the retail section of our website!  Cost is $139.99 plus tax and shipping. Order now- USA Shipping Order Now – Shipping outside the USA Retail Store – 717-566-7100 ext. 103 Here are some images taken of the models when they were being built in the United Kingdom. More on Brooklin Models: Brooklin Models Limited is currently the world’s leading manufacturer of 1/43 scale hand-built white metal models. The manufacturing process includes the meticulous creation of brass masters, from which vulcanized rubber moulds are made. Body moulds are created by the careful layering of strips of virgin rubber onto the master, encasing it in a steel frame, and vulcanizing at over 300°F. Centrifugal casting machines are used for creating baseplates, headlights, wheels, dashboards, seats and other small parts. Each white metal body, as well as the numerous small parts, is then individually and fastidiously cleaned of flash and other imperfections. Bodies and sub-assemblies are then hand sprayed with automotive quality paints. Final assembly and packaging is also accomplished by hand, one...

Read More